Aerial Imagery Data available by Year

You can now search and download the imagery data from Aerial Digimap by the year it was flown. This allows you to be sure that you are downloading only the latest data, but it also allows you to download multiple images for the same location taken on different dates. We currently have data from 1998 […]

Food and drink in Scotland: Food provision, scarcity and health

This is the third and final post exploring food and drink in Scotland during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Here we look at the provision of food as payment, examples of when food was scarce, and the link between food and health.

Provision of food

There are many examples found in the Statistical Accounts of Scotland of food being provided as payment for services rendered. “Of old times, and at this very day, there is a proverb used in the Highlands, which, when translated, expresses literally, that it is, for decent food and accommodation, and not for wages, they (domestic servants) serve.” (OSA, Vol. XVI, 1795, p. 195) In Fossoway, County of Perth, “the wages of an able day-labourer throughout the year, is 1 s per day; the wages of a woman for the harvest, 8 d; for men between 10 d and 1 s per day; with breakfast and dinner for both.” (OSA, Vol. XVIII, 1796, p. 462) In the parish of King Edward, County of  Aberdeen, it was reported that all rent was paid in grain (OSA, Vol. XI, 1794, p. 403), whereas tenants in the parish of Slamanan, County of Stirling, generally paid most of their rent with butter and cheese. (OSA, Vol. XIV, 1795, p. 83)

Interestingly, one landlord in the parish of North Knapdale, County of Argyle, had his rent paid to him chiefly “in feasts given at the habitations of his tenants. What he was to spend, and the time of his residence at each village, was known, and provided for accordingly. The men who provided these entertainments partook of them; they all lived friends together; and the departures of the chief and his retinue never failed to occasion regret.” This ‘friendship’, however, had changed in more modern times. “Till very lately, in this neighbourhood, Campbell of Auchinbreck had a right to carry off the best cow he could find upon several properties, at each Martinmas, by way of mart… The Crown now has converted these cows at 20 s. a head, and taken away this badge of slavery.” (OSA, Vol. VI, 1793, p. 257)

It was not just about farmers and farm-labourers. In the Statistical Accounts, you can also discover the eating habits of those working in mills at the time. In the parish of New Abbey, County of Kirkcudbright, it was reported that women who worked spinning yarn “make sorry wages of it, not above 3 d. per day;-which can afford very scanty food”. (OSA, Vol. II, 1792, p. 132)

Towne, Charles; Backbarrow Cotton Mill, near Newby Bridge; Lakeland Arts Trust; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/backbarrow-cotton-mill-near-newby-bridge-145131

Towne, Charles; Backbarrow Cotton Mill, near Newby Bridge; Lakeland Arts Trust; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/backbarrow-cotton-mill-near-newby-bridge-145131

In Lanark, County of Lanark, the diet of children working in the mills “consists of oatmeal porridge, with milk in summer or sowens, i.e. oat-meal flummery, with milk in winter twice a day, as much as they can take, barley broth for dinner made with good fresh beef every day and as much beef is boiled as will allow 7 ounces English a piece each day to one half of the children, the other half get cheese and bread after their broth, so that they dine alternately upon cheese and butchermeat with barley bread or potatoes; and now and then in the proper season they have a dinner of herrings and potatoes. They as well as the others, begin work at six in the morning, are allowed half an hour to breakfast, an hour to dinner, and quit work at 7 at night; after which they attend the school at the expense of the proprietor till 9.” (OSA, Vol. XV, 1795, p. 37) In Lochwinnoch, County of Renfrew, ” the persons employed in the cotton-mills work twelve hours five days in the week, and nine hours on Saturday. They have one hour and forty minutes for both breakfast and dinner.” (NSA, Vol. VII, 1845, p. 104)

There is even an example given of what prisoners ate! In Linlithgow, County of Linlithgow, the prisoners’ “diet is excellent, consisting of six ounce of oatmeal made into porridge, for breakfast, with three-fourths of a pint of buttermilk. Dinner, ox-head broth, four ounce barley, four ounce bread, and a proportion of vegetables, each alternate day, pease-brose, fish, and potatoes. Supper the same as breakfast.” (NSA, Vol. II, 1845, P. 187)

Food scarcity

Some parish reports mention the years 1782 and 1783 in particular, when many harvests in Scotland failed. It is really interesting to read about what caused the failure of crops, according to the parish report of Kilwinning, County of Ayrshire.

“Different causes, no doubt, contributed to this failure, in different parts of the country: But in this parish, and in others immediately on the sea coast, the chief cause of its failure was owing to a very severe west wind, about the middle, or towards the latter end of the month of August, which continued with the utmost violence for a considerable time. The corns had their roots loosened, and were otherwise much damaged by this storm. From being in general very green, when it happened, in a few days afterwards they grew white, but never filled. Snow also, in such parts of the parish as were at the greatest distance from the sea, fell earlier, and in greater quantities, than ever had been known at that season of the year.” (OSA, Vol. XI, 1794, p. 153)

In Peterhead, County of Aberdeen, “the crop of 1782 was as defective in this parish as in other parts of Scotland; and without very great efforts, both of a public and private nature, many would have perished for want of food.” Everyone rallied together to avert death and suffering. This included “a considerable quantity of meal sent by Government, partly gratis, and partly at a low price” and “collections were made in the different churches, and voluntary assessments raised from the greatest part of the heritors”. (OSA, Vol. XVI, 1795, p. 579)

In Gargunnock, County of Stirling, “a large quantity of white peas being commissioned from England by a man of public spirit, and grinded into meal, assisted the other expedients which were then adopted to prevent a famine in this part of the kingdom.” (OSA, Vol. XVIII, 1796, p. 121) The parish of Kilmadan, County of Argyle, was not so hard hit as others, “but the crop in general, over the whole, suffered from the summer’s cold and the wet harvest. The poor were the better for the supply granted by Government.” (OSA, Vol. IV, 1792, p. 340) A particularly poignant account of food scarcity during these years and the affect it had on people can be found in the parish report of Keithhall, County of Aberdeen. “One family wanted food from Friday night till Sunday at dinner”.(OSA, Vol. II, 1792, p. 544)

A long period of food scarcity was also experienced in the parish of Kilsyth, County of Stirling, during the last seven years of the 17th century (also know as the seven dear years). The price of food became exorbitant and even the more opulent residents could not buy any corn. “Greens boiled with salt, became a common food. Fodder was as scarce as grain. Many of the cattle perished at the stall, and many of them who were driven out to seek a scanty pittance expired in the field.” (OSA, Vol. XVIII, 1796, p. 302)

Food and health

There are several mentions of the link between food and health in the Statistical Accounts, with some opinions apperaing contradictory! In the parish of Carsphairn, County of Kirkcudbright, “scurvies are little known, though most of the inhabitants live all the year round on salted provisions, which they use in great abundance. The pernicious consequences of this mode of living are obviated by the plentiful use of potatoes, and other vegetables.” (OSA, Vol. VII, 1793, p. 514)

It was noted in the report for Kilbrandon and Kilchattan, County of Argyle, that “dropsies are likewise observed of late to be more frequent, particularly since potatoes have become the principal food of the lower classes of the people. And certainly, though this useful and wholesome root contains no hurtful quality, yet change of diet must gradually affect and change the constitution. While many, therefore, whole food was more solid in their early period of life, and to whom this root was scarcely known, but now live by this three-fourths of the year, no wonder though disorders should prevail which were formerly less common.” (OSA, Vol. XIV, 1795, p. 160)

In the parish of Kelso, County of Roxburgh, it was thought that the food eaten by the labouring classes and the large quantity “may be one cause of laying the foundation of glandular and visceral diseases. Although the mechanics in town generally eat meat for dinner, the labourers in town and country seldom do so; but one and all of them live much upon hasty pudding, and boiled potatoes with milk; without deviation, they all breakfast or sup upon the one or the other. Most of the adults eat of this food, at a meal, from 6 to 8 English pounds weight, including milk”, resulting in various unpleasant complaints and even death. (OSA, Vol. X, 1794, p. 594) In this parish, the sheer amount of food people ate, as well as the “sudden change from vegetable to animal food and the too frequent use of spirituous liquors” was believed to inflict many health problems on its residents.

Painting called 'The Doctor's Visit' by Thomas Faed, 1889. Queen's University, Belfast; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/the-doctors-visit-168946

Faed, Thomas; The Doctor’s Visit; 1889. Queen’s University, Belfast; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/the-doctors-visit-168946

In Banff, “an infectious fever prevailed here, with unusual violence, about the year 1782. Unwholesome food, particularly an immoderate use of potatoes, (that year of a bad kind), were among the secondary causes to which this fever was ascribed.” (As you know, the year 1782 was a bad year for crops!) Mr Skene, “the late minister of this parish, wrote a wrote a small treatise on this fever, in form of a “Serious Address to the People,” etc. This short address, which Provost Robinson had paid to print and publish, “contained several plain sensible instructions respecting the prevention and treatment of the disease, and points out the means by which health may be preserved from every disorder of an infectious nature.” For examples of his recommendations see OSA, Vol. XX, 1798, p. 347.

Scrofula was a disease that had prevailed in times of food scarcity (when food was lacking in both quantity and quality) in the parish of Duthil, County of Elgin. “In the summers of 1808, 1816, and 1817, many families subsisted for several successive weeks on the tops of nettles, mugwort, turnip thinnings, and milk, without any corn food; and such as subsisted on this miserable substitute for food, are labouring under the […] disease.” (NSA, Vol. XIII, 1845, p. 125) There was, however, better news for residents of the parish of Borgue, County of Kirkcudbright. “From greater attention to cleanliness, and a more plentiful use of vegetables and fresh animal food, scorbutic and cutaneous diseases are less prevalent than formerly.” (OSA, Vol. XI, 1794, p. 34)

Surprisingly, tea was seen as bad for the health in several parish reports! In the parish of Delting, County of Shetland, some thought that the increase of diseases “may be ascribed to the change in the mode of living, especially to the general use of tea, of which the consumption is amazing, even in the poorest families, who will stint themselves in many essential necessaries of life, in order to procure this article of luxury.” (OSA, Vol. I, 1791, p. 386) This extract on the use of tea found in the report for Gargunnock, County of Stirling, is very amusing. “Tea is universally used. Even the poorest families have it occasionally, and the last cup is qualified with a little whisky, which is supposed to correct all the bad effects of the tea.” (OSA, Vol. XVIII, 1796, p. 121) Conversely, in the parish report for Kirkcudbright, County of Kirkcudbright, tea and coffee are called “wholesome and enlivening beverages”. (NSA, Vol. IV, 1845, p. 37)

Conclusions

It has been fascinating to discover what the Scots ate and drank during the times of the Statistical Accounts. People had to grow and rear what they could to eat. This makes us think that those in the countryside would have had a better diet than those in the cities. But, this was not necessarily always the case. There were certainly differences between parishes due to their topography and climate. In some cases, inhabitants did not make the most of what the land and water had to offer, either because of a lack of knowledge and/or not enough hard work! There were also periods of food scarcity due to poor harvests, which affected everyone, both rich and poor. It must also be pointed out that, in many instances, the farmers sold their produce in the town and city markets.

Looking through the reports, it is clear that many changes took place between the Old and New Statistical Accounts, with improved agricultural practices and a growth in industry and technology, all resulting in increased production and trade. These benefited both those in the country and those in built-up areas. It was particularly interesting to find out what and when mill workers ate during the day, as well as what the link between food and health was believed to be in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. There is a wealth of information on food and drink in the Statistical Accounts. Why not explore it and see what you can find?

 

Share

Digital Scholarship Day of Ideas 2018 – Live Blog

Today I am at the Digital Scholarship Day of Ideas, organised by the Digital Scholarship programme at University of Edinburgh. I’ll be liveblogging all day so, as usual, I welcome additions, corrections, etc. 

Welcome & Introduction – Melissa Terras, Professor of Digital Cultural Heritage, University of Edinburgh

Hi everyone, it is my great pleasure to welcome you to the Digital Day of Ideas 2018 – I’ve been on stage here before as I spoke at the very first one in 2012. I am introducing the day but want to give my thanks to Anouk Lang and Professor James Loxley for putting the event together and their work in supporting digital scholarship. Today is an opportunity to focus on digital research methods and work.

Later on I am pleased that we have speakers from sociology and economic sociology, and the nexus of that with digital techniques, areas which will feed into the Edinburgh Futures Institute. We’ll also have opportunity to talk about the future of digital methods, and particularly what we can do here to support that.

Lynn Jameson – Introduction

Susan Halford is professor of sociology but also director of the institution-wide Web Science Institute.

Symphonic Social Science and the Future of Big Data Analytics – Susan J Halford, Professor of Sociology & Director of Web Science Institute, University of Southampton

Abstract: Recent years have seen ongoing battles between proponents of big data analytics, using new forms of digital data to make computational and statistical claims about the social world, and many social scientists who remain sceptical about the value of big data, its associated methods and claims to knowledge. This talk suggest that we must move beyond this, and offers some possible ways forward. The first part of the talk takes inspiration from a mode of argumentation identified as ‘symphonic social science’ which, it is suggested, offers a potential way forward. The second part of talk considers how we might put this into practice, with a particular emphasis on visualisation and the role that this could play in overcoming disciplinary hierarchies and enabling in-depth interdisciplinary collaboration.

It’s a great pleasure to be here in very sunny Edinburgh, and to be speaking to such a wide ranging audience. My own background is geography, politics, english literature, sociology and in recent years computer sciences. That interdisciplinary background has been increasingly important as we start to work with data, new forms of data, new types of work with data, and new knowledge – but lets query that – from that data. All this new work raises significant challenges especially as those individual fields come from very different backgrounds. I’m going to look at this from the perspective of sociology and perhaps the social sciences, I won’t claim to cover all of the arts and humanities as well.

My talk today is based on work that I have been doing with Mike Savage on “big data” and the new forms of practice emerging around these new forms of data, and the claims being made about how we understand the social world. In this world there has been something of a stand off between data scientists and social scientists. Chris Anderson (in 2008), a writer for Wired, essentially claimed “the data will speak for itself” – you won’t need the disciplines. Many have pushed back hard on this. The push back is partly methodological: these data do not capture every aspect of our lives, they capture partial traces, often lacking in demographic detail (do we care? sociologists generally do…) and we know little of its promise. And it is very hard to work with this data without computational methods – tools for pattern recognition generally, not usually thorough sociological approaches. And present concerning, something ethically problematic, results that are presented as unproblematic. So, this is highly challenging. John Goldthorpe says “whatever big data may have for “knowing capitalism” it’s value to social science has… remained open to questions…”.

Today I want to move beyond that stand out. The divisiveness and siloing of disciplines is destructive for the disciplines – it’s not good for social science and it’s not good for big data analytics either. From a social science perspective, that position marginalises social sciences, sociology specifically, and makes us unable to take part in this big data paradigm which – love it or loathe it – has growing importance, influence, and investment. We have to take part in this for three major reasons: (1) it is happening anyway – it will march forward with or without it; (2) these new data and methods do offer new opportunities for social sciences research and; (3) we may be able to shape big data analytics as the field emerges – it is very much in formation right now. It’s also really bad for data science not to engage with the social sciences… Anderson and others made these claims ten years ago… Reality hasn’t really shown that happen. In commercial contexts – recommendations, behaviour tracking and advertising, the data and analysis is doing that. But in actually drawing understanding from the world, it hasn’t really happened. And even the evangelists have moved on… Wired itself has moved to saying “big data is a tool, but should not be considered the solution”. Jeff Hammerbacker (co-credited for coining the term “data science” in 2008, said in 2013 “the best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads… that sucks”.

We have a wobble here, a real change in the discourse. We have a call for greater engagement with domain experts. We have a recognition that data are only part of the picture. We need to build a middle ground between those two positions of data science and social science. This isn’t easy… It’s really hard for a variety of reasons. There are bodies buried here… But rather than focus on that, I want to focus on how we take big steps forward here…

The inspiration here are three major social science projects: Bowling Alone (Robert Putnam); The Spirit Level – Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett; Capital – Thomas Piketty. These projects have made huge differences, influencing public policy and in the case of Bowling Alone, really reshaped how governments make policy. These aren’t by sociologists. They aren’t connected as such. The connection we make in our paper is that we see a new style of social science argumentation – and we see it as a way that social scientists may engage in data analytics.

There are some big similarities between these books. They are all data driven. Think about sociologists at the end of 20th century was highly theoretical… At the beginning of the 21st century we see data driven works. And they haven’t done their own research generating data here, they have drawn on existing research data. Piketty has drawn together diverse tax data… But also Jane Austen quotes… Not just mixed methods but huge repurposing. These books don’t make claims for causality based on data, their claims for causality is supported by theory. However they present data throughout and supporting their arguments. Data is key, with images to hold the data together. There is a “visual consistency”. The books each have a key graph that essentially summarises the book. Putnam talks about social capital, Piketty talks about the rise and fall of wealth inequality in the 20th century.

In each of these texts data, method and visualisation are woven into a repeat refrain, combined with theory as a composite whole to makes powerful arguments about the nature of social life and social change over the long term. We call this a “Symphonic Aesthetic” as different instruments and refrains build, come in and go… and the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

OK, thats an observation about the narrative… But why does that matter? We think it’s a way to engage with and disrupt big data. There are similarities: re-purposing multiple and varied “found” data sources; an emphasis on correlation; use of visualistion. There are differences too: theoretical awareness; choice of data; temporality is different – big data has huge sets of data looking at tiny focused and often real time moments. Social Science takes long term comparisons – potentially over 100 years. The role of correlation is different. Big data analytics looks for a result (at least in the early stage), in symphonic aesthetics there is a real interest in correlation through statistical and theoretical understandings. Practice of visualisation varies as well. In big data it is the results, in symphonic aesthetics it is part of the process, not the end of the process.

Those similarities are useful but there is much still to do: symphonic authors do not use new forms of digital data, their methods cannot simply be applied, big data demand new and unfamiliar skills and collaborations. So I want to talk about the prospective direction of travel around data; method; theory; visualisation practice.

So, firstly, data. If we talk about symphonic aesthetics we have to think about critical data pragmatism. That is about lateral thinking – redirection of what data exist already. And we have to move beyond naivety – we cannot claim they are “naturally occurring” mirrors/telescopes etc. They are deliberately social-technical constructions. And we need to understand what the data are and what they are not: socio-technical processes of data construction (eg carefully constructed samples); understanding and using demographic biases (go with the biases and use the data as appropriate, rather than claiming they are representative; or maybe ignore that, look at network construction, flows, mobilities – e.g. John Murrey’s work).

Secondly method. We have to be methodologically plural. Normally we do mixed methods – some quantitative, some qualitative. But most of us aren’t yet trained for computational methods, and that is a problem. Many of the most interesting things about these data – their scale, complexity etc. – are not things we can accommodate in our traditional methods. We need to extend our repertoire here. So social network analysis has a long and venerable history – we can apply the more intensive smaller version of large scale social network analysis. But we also need machine learning – supervised (with training sets) and unsupervised (without). This allows you to seek evidence of different perhaps even contradictory patterns. But also machine learning can help you find the structures and patterns in the data – which you may well not know in data sets at this scale.

We have this quote from Ari Goldberg (2015): “sociologists often round up the usual suspects. They enter the metaphorical crime scene every dat, armed with strong and well-theorised hypotheses about who the murderer should or at least plausibly might be.”

To be very clear I am not suggesting we outsource analysis to computational methods: we need to understand what the methods are doing and how.

Thirdly, theory. We have to use abductive reasoning – a constant interplay between data, method and theory. Initial methods may be informed by initial hunches, themes, etc. We might use those methods to see if there is something interesting there… Perhaps there isn’t, or perhaps you build upon this. That interplay and iterative process is, I suspect, something sociologists already do.

So, how do we bring this all together in practice? Most sociologists do not have a sophisticated understanding of the methods; and most computer scientists may understand the methods but not the theoretical elements. I am suggesting something end to end, with both sociologists and computer scientists working together.

It isn’t the only answer but I am suggesting that visualisation becomes an analytical method, rather than a “result”. And thinking about a space for work where both sociological and computer science expertise are equally valid rather than combatorial. At best visualisations are “instruments for reasoning about quantitative information. Often the most effective way to describe, explore and summarise a set of numbers – even a very large set – is to look at pictures of those numbers” (Tufte 1998). Visualisations as interdisciplinary boundary objects. Beyond a mode of argumentation… visualisation becomes a mode of practice.

An example of this was a visualisation of the network of a hashtag that was collaborative with my colleague Ramin, which developed over time as we asked each other questions about how the data was presented and what that means…

In conclusion, sociology flourished in the C20th. Developing methods, data and theory that gave us expertise in “the social” (a near monopoly). This is changing – new forms of data, new forms of expertise… And claims being made which we may, or may not, think are valid. And that stands on the work of sociologists. But there is some promise in the idea of symphonic aesthetic: for data science – data science has to be credible and there is recognition of that – see for instance Cathy O’Neil’s work on data science, “Weapons of Math Destruction” which also pushes in this direction. ; for sociological research – but not all of it, these won’t be the right methods for everyone; for public sociology – this being used in lots of ways already, algorithm sentencing debates, Cambridge Analytics… There is a real place for sociologists to reshape sociology in the public understanding. There are big epistemological implications here… Changing the data and methods changes what we study… But it has always been like that. Big data can do something different – not necessarily better, but different.

Q&A

Q1) I was really interested in your comments about visualisations as a method… Joanna Drucker talks about visual technology and visual discourse – and issues of visualisations as being biased towards positivistic approaches, and advocates for getting involved in the design of visualisation tools.

A1) I’m familiar with these concepts. That work I did with Ramin is early speculative work… But it builds and is based on classic social network analysis so yes, I agree, that reflects some issues.

Q2 – Tim Squirrel) I guess my question is about the trade off between access and making meaningful critiques. Often sociology is about critiquing power and methods by which power is transmitted. The more data proliferates, the more the data is locked behind doors – like the kind of data Facebook holds. And in order to access that data you ahve to compromise the kinds of critiques you can make. How do you navigate that narrow channel, to make critiques without compromising those…

Q2) The field is quite unsettled… It looks settled a year ago but I think Cambridge Analytica will have major impact… That may make the doors more closed… Or perhaps we will see these platforms – for instance Facebook – understanding that to retain credibility it has to create a segregation between their own use of the data, and research (not funded by Facebook), so that there is proper separation. But I’m not naive about how that will work in practice… Maybe we have to tread a careful line… And maybe that does mean not being critical in all the ways we might be, in every paper. Empirical data may help us make critical cases across the diverse range of scholarship taking place.

Q3 – Jake Broadhurst) Data science has been used in the social world already, how do we keep up and remain relevant?

A3) It is a pressing challenge. The academy does not have the scale or capacity to address data science in the way the private sector does. One of the big issues is ethics… And how difficult it is for academics to navigate ethics of social media and social data. And it is right that we are bound to ethical processes in a way data scientists and even journalists do not need to. But it is also absolutely right that our ethics committees have to understand new methods, and the realities of the gold standard consent and other options where that is not feasible.

The discussion we are having now, in the wake of Cambridge Analytica, is crucial. Two years ago I’d ask students what data they felt was collected, they just didn’t know. And understanding that is part of being relevant.

Q4 – Karen Gregory) If you were taking up a sociology PhD next year, how would you take that up?

A4) My official response would be that I’d do a PhD in Web Science. We have a programme at University of Southampton, taking students from a huge array of backgrounds, and giving them all the same theoretical and methodological backgrounds. They then have to have 2 supervisors, from at least 2 different disciplines for their PhD.

Q5 – Kate Orton Johnson) How do we tackle the structures of HE that prevent those interdisciplinary projects, creating space, time, collaborative push to create the things that you describe?

A5) It’s a continuous struggle. Money helps – we’ve had £10m from EPSRC and that really helps. UKRI could help – I’m sceptical but hopeful about interdisciplinary possibilities here. Having PhD supervision across really different disciplines is a beautiful thing, you learn so much and it leads to new things. Universities talk about interdisciplinary work but the reality doesn’t always match up. Money helps. Interdisciplinary research helps. Collaboration on small scales – conference papers etc. also help.

Q6 – David, research in AI and Law) I found your comments about dialogues between data scientists and social scientists… How can you achieve similar with law scholars and data scientists… Especially if trying to avoid hierachichal issues. Law and data science is a really interesting space right now… GDPR but also algorithmic accountability – legal aspects of equality, protected categories, etc. Very few users of big data have faced up to the risks of how they use the data, and potential for legal challenge on the basis of discrimination. You have to find joint enthusiasm areas, and fundable areas, and that’s where you have to start.

The Economics Agora Online: Open Surveys and the Politics of Expertise – Tod van Gunten, Lecturer in Economic Sociology, University of Edinburgh

Abstract: In recent years, research centres in both the United States and United Kingdom have conducted open online surveys of professional economists in order to inform the public about expert opinion.  Media attention to a US-based survey has centred on early research claiming to show a broad policy consensus among professional economists.  However, my own research shows that there is a clear alignment of political ideology in this survey.  My talk will discuss the value and limitations of these online surveys as tools for informing the public about expert opinion.

Workshops: Parallel workshop sessions – please see descriptors below.

  • Text Analysis for the Tech Beginner
  • An Introduction to Digital Manufacture – Mike Boyd (uCreate Studio Manager, UoE)
  • ‘I have the best words’: Twitter, Trump and Text Analysis – Dave Elsmore (EDINA)
  • An Introduction to Databases, with Maria DB & Navicat – Bridget Moynihan (LLC, UoE)
  • Introduction to Data Visualisation in Processing – Jules Rawlinson (Music, ECA, UoE)
  • Jupyter Notebooks and The University of Edinburgh Noteable service – Overview and Introduction – James Reid (EDINA)
  • Obtaining and working with Facebook Data – Simon Yuill (Goldsmiths)

Round Table Discussion

  • Melissa Terras, Professor of Digital Cultural Heritage
  • Kirsty Lingstadt, Head of Digital Library and Depute Director of Library and University Collections
    Ewan McAndrew, Wikimedian in Residence
    Tim Squirell, PhD Student, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies

 

Share/Bookmark

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service in the last week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Bristol University (03 May 18)
  • British Library (03 May 18)
  • City, University of London (02 May 18)
  • Durham University (04 May 18)
  • Edinburgh Napier University (01 May 18)
  • Exeter University (05 May 18)
  • King’s College London (02 May 18)
  • Manchester University (01 May 18)
  • National Library of Scotland (02 May 18)
  • National Library of Wales (01 May 18)
  • Natural History Museum (01 May 18)
  • Nottingham University (02 May 18)
  • Open University (01 May 18)
  • Queen’s University, Belfast (04 May 18)
  • Sheffield University (01 May 18)
  • Southampton University (06 May 18)
  • St. Andrews University (05 May 18)
  • Strathclyde University (01 May 18)
  • Sussex University (01 May 18)
  • Warwick University (02 May 18)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service in the last two weeks. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Aberystwyth University (01 May 18)
  • Bath University (01 May 18)
  • British Library (26 Apr 18)
  • Brunel University London (28 Apr 18)
  • Cardiff University (01 May 18)
  • CONSER (Not UK Holdings) (02 May 18)
  • Cranfield University (20 Apr 18)
  • De Montfort University (25 Apr 18)
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (19 Apr 18)
  • Dundee University (01 May 18)
  • Edinburgh University (01 May 18)
  • Imperial College London (01 May 18)
  • Kingston University (01 May 18)
  • Lancaster University (01 May 18)
  • London Library (29 Apr 18)
  • London School of Economics and Political Science (01 May 18)
  • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (01 May 18)
  • National Archives (01 May 18)
  • Northumbria University (01 May 18)
  • Oxford University (23 Apr 18)
  • Sheffield Hallam University (01 May 18)
  • Southampton University (29 Apr 18)
  • Swansea University (01 May 18)
  • University of Wales Trinity Saint David (01 May 18)
  • University of the West of England (24 Apr 18)
  • York University (01 May 18)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

Working with the British Library

This morning I’m at the “Working with the British Library’s Digital Content, Data and Services for your research (University of Edinburgh)” event at the Informatics Forum to hear about work that has been taking place at the British Library Labs programme, and with BL data recently. I’ll be liveblogging and, as usual, any comments, questions, 

Introduction and Welcome – Professor Melissa Terras

Welcome to this British Library Labs event, this is about work that fits into wider work taking place and coming here at Edinburgh. British Library Labs works in a space that is changing all the time, and we need to think about how we as researchers can use digital content and this kind of work – and we’ll be hearing from some Edinburgh researchers using British Library data in their work today.

“What is British Library Labs? How have we engaged researchers, artists, entrepreneurs and educators in using our digital collections” – Ben O’Steen, Technical Lead, British Library Labs

We work to engage researchers, artists, entrepreneurs and educators to use our digital collections – we don’t build stuff, we find ways to enable access and use of our data.

The British Library isn’t just our building in St Pancras, we also have a huge document supply and storage facility in Boston Spa. At St Pancras we don’t just have the collections, we have space to work, we have reading rooms, and we have five underground floors hidden away there. We also have a public mission and a “Living Knowledge Vision” which helps us to shape our work

British Library Labs has been running for four years now, funded by the Andrew Mellow Fund, and we are in our third funded phase where we are trying to make this business as usual… So the BL supports the reader who wants to read 3 things, and the reader who wants to read 300,000 things. To do that we have some challenges to face to make things more accessible – not least to help people deal with the sheer scale of the collections. And we want to avoid people having to learn unfamiliar formats and methodologies which are about the library and our processes. We also want to help people explore the feel of collections, their “shape” – what’s missing, what’s there, why and how to understand that. We also want to help people navigate data in new ways.

So, for the last few years we have been trying to help researchers address their own specific problems, but also trying to work out if that is part of a wider problem, to see where there are general issues. But a lot of what we have done has been about getting started… We have a lot of items – about 180 million – but any count e have is always an estimates. Those items include 14m books, 60m patents, 8m stamps, 3m sound recordings… So what do researchers ask for….

Well, researchers often ask for all the content we have. That hides the failure that we should have better tools to understand what is there, and what they want. That is a big ask, but that means a lot of internal change. So, we try to give researchers as much as we have… Sometimes thats TBs of data, sometimes GBs.. And data might be all sorts of stuff – not just the text but the images, the bindings, etc. If we take a digitised item we have an image of the cover, we have pictures, we have text, we also have OCR for these books – when people ask for “all” the book – is that the images, the OCR or both? One of those is much easier to provide…

Facial recognition is quite hot right now… That was one of the original reasons to access all of the illustrations – I run something called the Mechanical Curator to help highlight those images – they asked if they could have the images – so we now have 120m images on Flickr. What we knew about images was the book, and the page. All the categorisation and metadata now there has been from people and machines looking at the data. We worked with Wikimedia UK to find maps, using manual and machine learning techniques – kind of in competition – to identify those maps… And they have now been moved into georeferencing tools (bl.uk/maps) and fed back to Flickr and also into the catalgue… But that breaks the catalogue… It’s not the best way to do this, so that has triggered conversations within the library about what we do differently, what we do extra.

As part of the crowdsourcing I built an arcade machine – and we ran a game jam with several usable games to categorise or confirm categories. That’s currently in the hallway by the lifts in the building, and was the result of work with researchers.

We put our content out there under CC0 license, and then we have awards to recognise great use of our data. And this was submitted – a video of Hey There Young Sailor official music video using that content! We also have the Off the Map copetition – a curated set of data for undergraduate gaming students based on a theme… Every year there is something exceptional.

I mentioned library catalogue being challenging. And not always understanding that when you ask for everything, that isn’t everything that exists. But there are still holes…. When we look at the metadata for our 19th century books we see huge amounts of data in [square brackets] meaning the data isn’t known but is the best suggestion. And this becomes more obvious when we look at work researcher Pieter Francois did on the collection – showing spikes in publication dates at 5 year intervals… Which reflects the guesses at publication year that tend to be e.g. 1800/1805/1810. So if you take intervals to shape your data, it will be distorted. And then what we have digitised is not representative of that, and it’s a very small part of the collection…

There is bias in digitisation then, and we try to help others understand that. Right now our digitised collections are about 3% of our collections. Of the digitised material 15% is openly licensed. But only about 10% is online. About 85% of our collections cn only be accessed “on site” as licenses were written pre-internet. We have been exploring that, and exploring what that means…

So, back to use of our data… People have a hierachy of needs from big broad questions down to filtered and specific queries… We have to get to the place where we can address those specific questions. We know we have messy OCR, so that needs addressing.

We have people looking for (sometimes terrible) jokes – see Victorian Humour run by Bob Nicholson based on his research – this is stuff that can’t be found with keywords…

We have Kavina Novrakas mapping political activity in the 19th Century. This looks different but uses the same data and the same platform – using Jupyter Notebooks. And we have researchers looking at black abolitionists. We have SherlockNet trying to do image classification… And we find work all over the place building on our data, on our images… We found a card game – Moveable Type – built on our images. And David Normal building montages of images. We’ve had poetic places project.

So, we try to help people explore. We know that our services need to be better… And that our services shape expectations of the data – and can omit and hide aspects of the collections. Exploring data is difficult, especially with collections at this scale – and it often requires specific skills and capabilities.

British Library Labs working with University of Edinburgh and University of St Andrews Researchers

“Text Mining of News Broadcasts” – Dr. Beatrice Alex, Informatics (University of Edinburgh)

Today I’ll be talking about my work with speech data, which is funded by my Turing fellowship. I work in a group who have mainly worked with text, but this project has built on work with speech transcripts – and I am doing work on a project with news footage, and dialogues between humans and robots.

The challenges of working with speech includes particular characteristics: short utterances, interjections; speaker assumptions – different from e.g. newspaper text; turn taking.  Often transcripts miss sentence boundaries, punctuation or missing case distinctions. And there are errors introduced by speech recognition.

So, I’m just going to show you an example of our work which you can view online – https://jekyll.inf.ed.ac.uk/geoparser-speech/. Here you can do real time speech recognition, and this can then also be run through the Edinburgh Geoparser to look for locations and identify their locations on the map. There are a few errors and, where locations haven’t been recognised in the speech recognition they also don’t map well. The steps in this pipeline is speech recognition… ASR then Google Text Restoration, and then text and data mining.

So, at the BL I’ve been working with Luke McKernan, lead curator for news and moving images. I have had access to a small set of example news broadcast files for prototype development. This is too small for testing/validation – I’d have to be onsite at BL to work on the full collection. And I’ve been using the CallHome collection (telephone transcripts) and BBC data which is available locally at Informatics.

So looking at an example we can see good text recognition. In my work I have implemented a case restoration step (named entities and sentence initials) using rule based lexicon lookup, and also using Punctuator 2 – an open source tool which adds punctuation. That works much better but isn’t up to an ideal level there. Meanwhile the Geoparser was designed for text so works well but misses things… Improvement work has taken place but there is more to do… And we have named entity recognition in use here too – looking for location, names, etc.

The next steps is to test the effect of ASR quality on text mining – using CallHome and BBC broadcast data) using formal evaluation; improve the text mining on speech transcript data based on further error analysis; and longer term plans include applications in the healthcare sector.

Q&A

Q1) Could this technology be applied to songs?

A1) It could be – we haven’t worked with songs before but we could look at applying it.

“Text Mining Historical Newspapers” – Dr. Beatrice Alex and Dr. Claire Grover, Senior Research Fellow, Informatics (University of Edinburgh) [Bea Alex will present Claire’s paper on her behalf]

Claire is involved in an Adinistrative Data Research Centre Scotland project looking at local Scottish Newspapers, text mine it, and connect it to other work. Claire managed to get access to the BL newspapers through Cengage and Gale – with help from the University of Edinburgh Library. This isn’t all of the BL newspaper collection, but part of it. This collection of data is also now available for use by other researchers at Edinburgh. Issues we had here ws that access to more reent newspaper is difficult, and the OCR quality. Claire’s work focused on three papers in the first instance, from Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh.

Claire adapted the Edinburgh Geoparser to process the OCR format of the newspapers and added local gazetteer resouces fro Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh from OS OpenData. Each article was then automatically annotated with paragraph, sentence, work mark-up; named entities – people, place, organisation; location; geo coordinates.

So, for example, a scanned item from the Edinburgh Evening News from 1904 – its not a great scan but the OCR is OK but erroneous. Named entities are identified, locations are marked. Because of the scale of the data Claire took just one year from most of the papers and worked with a huge number of articles, announcments, images etc. She also drilled down into the geoparsed newspaper articles.

So for Abereen in 1922 there were over 19 million word/punctuation tokens and over 230,000 location mentions Then used frequency methods and concordances to understand the data. For instance she looked for mentions of Aberdeen placenames by frequency – and that shows the regions/districts of abersteen – Torry, Woodside, and also Union Street… Then Claire dug down again… Looking at Torry the mentions included Office, Rooms, Suit, etc, which gives a sense of the area – a place people rented accommoation in. In just the news articles (not ads etc) then for Torry it’s about Council, Parish, Councillor, politics, etc.

Looking at Concordances Claire looked at “fish”, for instance” to see what else was mentioned and, in summary, she noted that the industry was depressed after WW1; there was unemployment in Aberdeen and the fishing towns of Aberdeenshire; that there was competition rom German trawlers landing Icelandic fish; that there were hopes to work with Germany and Russia on the industry; and that government was involved in supporting the industry and taking action to improve it.

With the Dundee data we can see the Topic Modelling that Claire did for the articles – for instance clustering of cars, police, accidents etc; there is a farming and agriculture topic; sports (golf etc)… And you can look at the headlines from those topics and see how that reflect the identified topics.

So, next steps for this work will include: improving text analysis and geoparsing components; get access to more recent newspapers – but there is issing infrastructure for larger data sets but we are working on this; scale up the system to process whole data set and store text ining output; tools to summarise content; and tools for search – filtering by place, data, linguistic context – tools beyond the command line.

“Visualizing Cultural Collections as a Speculative Process” – Dr. Uta Hinrichs, Lecturer at the School of Computer Science (University of St Andrews)

“Public Private Digitisation Partnerships at the British Library” – Hugh Brown, British Library Digitisation Project Manager

“The Future of BL Labs and Digital Research at the Library” – Ben O’Steen

Conclusion and wrap up

 

Share/Bookmark

Food and drink in Scotland: Why Scots ate and drank what they did

The previous post on Scotland’s food and drink highlights the fact that what people ate was very much dependent on what people could grow, according to climate, topography and soil type.

In Kilbride, County of Bute, “the soil is hard and stony. Most of the farms lying on the declivity of hills, the best prepared land scarce yields two returns. To supply the deficiency of corn, the inhabitants plant great quantities of potatoes, which are their principal food for 9 months in the year.” (OSA, Vol. VIII, 1793, p. 578)

In contrast, the soil in the parish of North Berwick, County of Haddington, was “, in general, rich, fertile, and well cultivated, producing large crops of all the different grains sown in Scotland, as wheat, barley, oats, pease and beans. No hemp is raised, and the quantity of flax is inconsiderable, being only for private use. Turnips are cultivated, but not to a great extent, as the farmers reckon the ground to be in general too strong and wet for that useful plant, and on that account commonly prefer sowing wheat upon their fallows. Potatoes are raised in considerable quantities, and, during the winter, form a principal part of the food of the poorer classes of the people.” (OSA, Vol. V, 1793, p. 441)

Farquharson, David; The Banks o' Allan Water; Royal Scottish Academy of Art & Architecture; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/the-banks-o-allan-water-206475

Farquharson, David: The Banks o’ Allan Water, 1877. Photo credit: Royal Scottish Academy of Art & Architecture

You can really sense from reading the parish reports that there was a real understanding of what crops could be successfully cultivated and how best to grow them. For example, in Ferry Port-on-Craig, County of Fife:

“The crops that are best adapted for the clay, to produce the greatest profit, are, wheat, beans, barley, grass, and oats. Flax is sown to very good advantage; but, on the whole, it is rather an uncertain crop; it likewise produces potatoes, but the quality is generally not so good as in light soils. The strong loam stands on a whin rock; and, where there is sufficiency of soil, it produces wheat, oats, beans, barley, grass and potatoes, in great perfection. Flax is sometimes sown on this soil, but seldom proves a good crop.” (OSA, Vol. VIII, 1793, p. 458)

In the parish report for Kinloch, County of Perth, several varieties of potatoes cultivated in that parish are mentioned, including the London Lady, the red-nosed-white kidney potato and the dark red Lancashire potato. Some advice is even given on “the best method of preventing potatoes from degenerating, and of rendering them more prolific”. (OSA, Vol. XVII, 1796, p. 472)

It seems that the widest range of produce was grown in the north of Scotland. In Unst, County of Shetland, the list of what was cultivated is very impressive:

“Black oats, bear, potatoes, cabbages, and various garden roots, and greens which grow in great perfection, are the most common vegetables in this island. Artichokes, too, of a delicate taste, are produced here, with some small fruit, and most of the garden flowers that grow in the north of Scotland. There is little or no sown grass, but the meadows are rich in red and white clover, and in the seasons of vegetation, are enameled with a beautiful profusion of wild flowers. The pasture grounds, in the commons, are generally covered with a short, tender, flowering heath. Some curious and rare plants have been discovered in this island by some gentlemen skilled in botany. The common people gather scurvy grass, trefoil, and some other plants that grow in the island, for their medicinal qualities. The roots of the tormentil are used in tanning bides.” (OSA, Vol. V, 1793, p. 186)

Reay, County of Caithness, was another parish which produced “an abundance of all provisions necessary for the use of the inhabitants. The exports are in general bear, oatmeal, beef, mutton, pork, geese, hens, butter, cheese, tallow, malt, whiskey, to the market of Thurso; black cattle, sold to drovers from the south; horse colts, sent to Orkney; lambs, to the lowlands; geese, sometimes to Sutherland and Ross; as also hides, skins, goose-quills, and other feathers.” (OSA, Vol. VII, 1793, p. 575)

This knowledge extended to the preservation and transportation of food. One “adventurer” from the parish of Dyke and Moy, County of Elgin, “cured a quantity [of cod] in barrels, like salted salmon, carried them to London, and made no loss by the adventure, though they sold heavily, and must have been but unpleasant food. But had these cod been parboiled, and cured with vinegar at the boil-house, like kitted salmon, it is believed, such soused fish would have excelled the salted, as much as the kitted salmon exceeds the salted, in quality and price.” (OSA, Vol. XX, 1798, p. 209)

Selling of produce

In most cases, what was cultivated or reared by farmers was then sold in the large towns and cities. In the parish of New Machar, County of Aberdeen, its proximity to the city of Aberdeen was seen as a big advantage, as there was “a constant demand, ready market, and a reasonable price for every article which the farms produce.” However, it was also seen as a disadvantage, as it “renders every article sold within the parish, very high priced to those who must buy; and that the country people are so much in the way of attending the weekly market, that they generally lose one day in the week, in order to dispose of an article, which when sold, will scarcely bring them 1 s. 6 d. never considering the loss of time and labour”. (OSA, Vol. VI, 1793, p. 469)

Aberdeen_Fish_Market

Aberdeen Fish Market by Frederick Whymper, 1883. Freshwater and Marine Image Bank, University of Washington [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

It was not only cities that had to buy food produced elsewhere. In Lochbroom, County of Ross and Cromarty, “with regard to their food, fish and potatoes constitute the principal part. For most years the produce of the soil does not afford them a sufficient supply of meal, and they usually buy a considerable quantity, and that often at a very high rate, from vessels which are sent by meal-mongers to the country.” (OSA, Vol. X, 1794, p. 470)

As a result of growing and raising such produce, farmers themselves began to become more wealthy, as pointed out in the parish report for Cambuslang, County of Lanark:

“The farmer, as well as the merchant, came by degrees to relish the conveniences, and even the luxuries of life; a remarkable change took place in his lodging, clothing, and manner of living. The difference in the state of the country, in the value of land and mode of cultivation, in the price of provisions and the wages of labour, in food and clothing, between the years 1750 and 1790, deserves to be particularly recorded.” (OSA, Vol. V, 1793, p. 251)

However, not all farmers were so hard-working and successful! In a survey, carried out in 1778, it was found that the inhabitants of Auchterarder, County of Perth, were “idle and poor farmers not thinking it necessary to thin their turnip while small, allowing them to grow until they be the size of large kale plants, and then it is thought a great loss to take them up, unless in small quantities, to give to the cow. A few tenants excepted, no family had oat-meal in their houses, nor could they get any. The oat nothing better than bear-meal and a few greens boiled together at mid-day, for dinner, and bear-meal pottage evening and morning.” (NSA, Vol. X, 1845, p. 288)

Vocabulary

In an interesting aside, the peasantry in the parish Cross and Burness, County of Orkney, used “a good many words […] peculiar to the north isles, and some of them are evidently of Scandinavian origin.” Many of these words were farming and food-related. Here are the first few words given:

“Abin, (v.) to thrash half a sheaf for giving horses. –Abir, (n.) a sheaf so thrashed. –Acamy, (adj.) diminutive. –Bal, (v.) to throw at-Been-hook, (n.) part of the rent paid by a cottar for his land is work all harvest; but besides his own labour, he must bring out his wife three days, for which she receives nothing but her food. All the women on a farm are called out at the same time; they work together, and are called been hooks, and the days on which they work been-hook days. –Bull, (n.) one of the divisions or stalls of a stable. –Buily, (n.) a feast. –Buist, (n.) a small box. –Builte, or Buito, (n.) a piece of flannel or home-made cloth, worn by women over the head and shoulders. –Brammo, (n.) a mess of oatmeal and water. –Bret, (v.) to strut. –Brodend, (adj.) habituated to. –Burstin, (n.) meal made of corn parched in a pot or “hellio”…” (NSA, Vol. XV, 1845, p. 95)

(Look out for our posts on Scotland and its languages coming soon!)

Conclusion

It is clear that Scots in the countryside ate what they themselves produced, which was dependent on the climate, topography – and not forgetting knowledge and hard-work! Those in cities, such as Glasgow and Aberdeen, were able to buy this produce in markets. Increased knowledge, new technologies and the exporting of goods from other countries had seen the situation change for the better over the years.

In the next post on Scotland’s food and drink we will look at times of food scarcity, the provision of food as part-payment and the link between food and health as seen by those in the late-eighteenth/early-nineteenth  centuries.

Share

Land Use Maps and Simple GIS

Hi folks, yesterday (25th April) we ran a quick 30 minute webinar showcasing some of the activities you can undertake very quickly and easily using Digimap for Schools.

I recorded the session, so you can have a look below or go directly to our youtube page to find other useful webinars.

https://www.youtube.com/user/digimapforschools

The session below covers some simple concepts that help create a land use map; drawing area’s, using the colour palette to tailor your map, editing areas and text, adding images and also creating map keys.  We also do some very simple GIS using postcodes and buffers, and actually delve a little deeper and download some official crime stats and map them in Digimap for Schools.  Have a gander below, though you may want to expand the view to full page 😉

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Got 10 minutes?

We’ve put together a series of 4 short guides on using Digimap for Schools. The guides are intended to be worked through over 4 weeks and new subscribers to the service will be sent one each week, post sign-up. Each guide takes just 10 minutes and by week 4, you’ll be making the most of the cross-curricular potential that Digimap for Schools offers.

We guide you sequentially through key features and provide short videos to demonstrate each function. A short practise exercise plus links to some of our lesson ideas are included.

Have a look and let us know what you think!

  • Week 1 Maps and Places Get to grips with the essentials of searching, zooming and viewing our range of maps – contemporary, historic and aerial.
  • Week 2 Making your mark Find out how to add text, shapes, symbols and images to your maps.  Create prints in different sizes and formats. Organise your maps into folders for different classes or projects.
  • Week 3 The numbers Check out how to find a grid reference and measure map features. Add measurement labels to any shapes and lines you create.
Week 3 - add measurement labels.

Week 3 – add measurement labels.

Lesson ideas

Remember we have lots of resources, written by curriculum experts,  with great ideas for using Digimap for Schools. Browse by subject and level at our resources site:

https://dfsresources.edina.ac.uk/

Keep in touch

We really value your feedback so let us know if we can improve these, or if there are any other resources that we can provide to help you get mapping!