SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated.  Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week.  The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • British Museum Library (03 Nov 14)
  • Brunel University (01 Nov 14)
  • CONSER (26 Nov 14)
  • Cranfield University (20 Nov 14)
  • Dundee University (19 Nov 14)
  • Edinburgh University (21 Nov 14)
  • Glasgow University (06 Nov 14)
  • ISSN (18 Nov 14)
  • London Metropolitan University (25 Nov 14)
  • Newcastle University (24 Nov 14)
  • St Andrews University (11 Nov 14)
  • Southampton University (23 Nov 14)
  • University of East Anglia (22 Oct 14)
  • University of the West of England (UWE) (23 Nov 14)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

The Troubled History of the Berlin Wall

 

A View of the Brandenburg Gate through barbed wire of the first Berlin Wall c.1961 Roving Report: The Gilded Cage 19-06-1963

A View of the Brandenburg Gate through barbed wire of the first Berlin Wall c.1961
Roving Report: The Gilded Cage 19-06-1963

Twenty five years ago one of the most extraordinary barriers ever constructed was torn down by the people it was designed to oppress. The Berlin Wall was built in 1961 to prevent East Germans reaching West Berlin, but to understand why it was put up in the first place we have to reach back to events following the end of WWII.

In May 1945 much of the great city of Berlin lay in ruins following intense bombardment by the Allies as they closed in to destroy Hitler and the power of the Third Reich. The image below shows children playing in the bombed out city. This deceptively jolly newsclip gives a flavour of conditions at the time.

The British Army relocates 50,000 children to the Western Sector of Berlin Looking after the children of Berlin: Gaumont British News 08-11-1945

The British Army relocates 50,000 children to the Western Sector of Berlin
Looking after the children of Berlin: Gaumont British News 08-11-1945

In line with the Potsdam Agreement the city was divided into sectors; one for each of the four Allies (Britain, France, the Soviet Union and the USA). Over the next two years tensions grew as the Soviets showed little inclination to rebuild their part of the city. The Allies, however, wished for a thriving new German economy to help Europe recover from the huge cost of the war. In addition Berlin was located in the heart of East Germany, one hundred miles behind the Iron Curtain, in the midst of the Eastern Bloc which was inveterately opposed to Capitalism.

The Soviets disrupt train travel of  Allied forces and civilians to West Berlin: The Berlin Crisis: Gaumont British News:  08-04-1948

The Soviets disrupt train travel of Allied forces and civilians to West Berlin:
The Berlin Crisis: Gaumont British News: 08-04-1948

By April 1948 the Soviets had begun to make life difficult for those in West Berlin. This clip from Gaumont British News shows how they disrupted rail traffic for those travelling to the Western Sector across East Germany. Soon a blockade was in place preventing the delivery of food and other materials. The attempts of the Soviets to starve out the West Berliners were foiled by the Allied Forces who ensured regular air deliveries of essential supplies. Click on the image below to see a newsclip showing how this was done. The Cold War had now begun in earnest.

Allied Forces break the Soviet Blockade by flying in food supplies Food Planes Fly to Berlin: Gaumont British News: 05-07-1948

Allied Forces break the Soviet Blockade by flying in food supplies
Food Planes Fly to Berlin: Gaumont British News: 05-07-1948

Over a year later the blockade was lifted, but this was only the beginning of problems that grew from the troubled relationship between the Soviets and the Allies. The East Germans themselves were experiencing many difficulties living in a Communist state with a poor economy and a crumbling infrastructure. This dramatic 1953 newsclip tells how riots broke out in protest at government threats to reduce wages; they were quickly and cruelly repressed.

East Germans riot against demands for increased productivity  Riots In Berlin: Gaumont British News: 22-06-1953

East German workers riot against demands for increased productivity
Riots In Berlin: Gaumont British News: 22-06-1953

Throughout the 1950s the contrast between the economies of West and East Germany became increasingly pronounced. West Berlin was a thriving place to live with high wages and a good standard of living; despite being completely surrounded by the Iron Curtain. Those in East Berlin had little chance to improve their lives and faced restricted personal freedoms, so it was not surprising that by 1957 a million had crossed the border to the West through West Berlin.

Willy Brandt, the charismatic Mayor of West Berlin talks about hopes for the future Berlin Today: Roving Report   20-11-1957

Willy Brandt, the charismatic Mayor of West Berlin, talks about hopes for the future
Berlin Today: Roving Report 20-11-1957

As the years went by the situation became more extreme. East Germans left for West Berlin in their droves to live in transit camps and seek a better life. This interesting Roving Report (Berlin Today) was made on location in 1957 and documents how the people in both sectors were dealing with their problems. As one West Berliner put it : “If we’d spent the last ten years worrying we’d have gone mad by now”.

Map showing the postion of Berlin within Soviet occupied East Germany Roving Report: How Many Germanies? 13-05-1959

Map showing the postion of Berlin within Soviet occupied East Germany
Roving Report: How Many Germanies? 13-05-1959

Another Roving Report made in 1959 asks the question, ‘How Many Germanies?’. Prompted by the forthcoming Geneva Conference, the programme looks at what Germans want now. Students talk about how they can’t really remember when Germany was one country anymore and they would rather keep the status quo than risk any armed conflict arising from the reunification initiative then being promoted by Britain and the USA. The Geneva Conference did not succeed in its aims and by the summer of 1961 a crisis point was reached.

The Divided City

The Divided City: Roving Report: 07-06-1961

Click on the image above to watch the Roving Report documentary ‘The Divided City‘ which examines living conditions and political attitudes in East and West Berlin in June 1961. The documentary shows the huge divide in lifestyle between the East and West Germans. How could the thriving capitalist sector of West Berlin continue to exist within a Marxist-Leninist East Germany? It was an anomaly the Soviets wished to erase and by the 13th August the turning point had come. On that day 50,000 East German troops constructed the first barbed wire wall around West Berlin within a few hours.

Allied Troops face East German forces at Checkpoint Charlie as the first Berlin Wall goes up Roving Reports: The Gilded Cage  19-06-1963

Allied Troops face East German forces at Checkpoint Charlie as the first Berlin Wall goes up on 13-08-1961
Roving Reports: The Gilded Cage 19-06-1963

The original wall was eventually reinforced by a second one of brick and concrete which extended around the entire perimeter of the Western sector. The sole aim of the Berlin Wall was to stop East Germans reaching West Berlin and from there defecting to the West.

Crisis In Berlin 1

East German guards putting up a section of the first wire wall Roving Report: Crisis in Berlin: 23-08-1961

Click on the image above to watch another excellent Roving Report (Crisis in Berlin) which was broadcast on 23-08-1961. You will hear the reaction of West Berliners; many of whom criticised Britain, France and the USA for taking no actions over the Wall. The mayor, Willy Brandt, wrote to President Kennedy declaring:

Berlin expects more than words…

So why did the West not act more assertively ?  It was thought the Soviets would not go to all the trouble of building the Wall if they had serious plans to take over West Berlin, which had been a persistent fear for over a decade. Nevertheless the situation was balanced on a knife’s edge and it was recognised that any movement of aggression by one side could spark off another great conflict, which was to be avoided at all costs.

Hugh Gaitskell talks about the how the West should react to the Berlin Wall: ITV News: 12-09-1961

Hugh Gaitskell talks about the how the West should react to the Berlin Wall:
ITV News: 12-09-1961

Click on the image above to hear Hugh Gaitskell, the leader of the Labour Party, discuss the fears and dangers the newly constructed Wall now posed. In a further interview  on 6th Jan 1962 Hugh Gaitskell  declared the Berlin Wall was “an appalling advertisement for Communism”.

If I were a communist propagandist I would regard this as about the biggest embarrassment I had to face…..

Prosperous West Berliners visit one of their 18 theatres Roving Report: The Gilded Cage   19-06-1963

Prosperous West Berliners visit one of their 18 theatres
Roving Report: The Gilded Cage 19-06-1963

This 1963 Roving Report documentary likens life in West Berlin to being in a gilded cage. The difference in lifestyle between the two sectors was impossible to reconcile. The film is particularly interesting due to an interview with some British exchange students who also visited the Soviet sector. A few days later President Kennedy came to Berlin and made his famous speech ‘Ich bin ein Berliner‘ to demonstrate his continuing support for West Berliners.

A method used by East German spies for smuggling microfilm  Roving Report: The Spy Catchers 12-12-1963

A method used by East German spies for smuggling microfilm
Roving Report: The Spy Catchers 12-12-1963

At this time the Cold War was at its height. In West Germany alone it was estimated there were 16,000 communist spies, many of whom worked in the capital, Bonn. Another Roving Report (‘The Spycatchers’) looks at the extent to which the Civil Service had been infiltrated and contains a very interesting feature on the Spycatchers Museum which was a training ground for West German Intelligence. It’s no coincidence the James Bond franchise started in 1962 and John le Carre’s book ‘The Spy who came in from the Cold’ was first published in 1963.

The House of Checkpoint Charlie: A bubble car used in a successful escape attempt. Channel 4 Berlin Wall B'ground:  08-08-1986

The House of Checkpoint Charlie: A bubble car used in a successful escape attempt.
Channel 4 Berlin Wall B’ground: 08-08-1986

The Wall remained in force for over 28 years and became a symbol of great human suffering. Many East Germans continued to try and escape through or over the Wall; some were successful and others died in the attempt. Click on the image above to watch a fascinating clip about the House of Checkpoint Charlie which displays some of the methods used to escape to West Berlin.

A view of the notorious 'Death Strip' where many were gunned down as they tried to cross the Wall

A view of the notorious ‘Death Strip’ where many were gunned down as they tried to cross the Wall: Channel 4 News: Berlin Wall Opening: 1st Anniversary 08-11-1990

By the late 1980s Mikhail Gorbachev‘s policies of Perestroika and Glasnost were bringing about radical economic and social reform within the Soviet Union. He also ensured the Soviet Union no longer controlled the governments of other Eastern Bloc countries which resulted in the end of the Cold War. Along with many other Eastern Bloc states, East Germany experienced a peaceful revolution against Soviet Communism during 1989 which resulted in freedom of movement to the West. And so it was on 9th November 1989 the East Germans unexpectedly discovered they were allowed to cross the Berlin Wall……..

Ecstatic East Berliners start to tear holes in the Berlin Wall Channel 4 News: Programme as Broadcast  09-11-1989

Ecstatic East Berliners start to tear holes in the Berlin Wall
Channel 4 News: Programme as Broadcast 09-11-1989

This Channel 4 News programme shows the excitement and joy of the East Berliners as they struggled to understand the Wall was no longer a barrier to their freedom. Most young people under the age of 30 would never have crossed the Wall until this moment.

West Berliners pull down a section of the Berlin Wall at the Brandenburg Gate: East/West Germany: The Berlin Wall : ITV News 11-11-1989

A couple of days later ITV’s News at Ten showed West and East Berliners celebrating together after 28 years of separation. There had not been scenes like this since the end of WWII in 1945. The work of reunifying East and West Germany began immediately and was achieved in less than a year; however many worried the process was too rapid, as this Channel 4 News clip demonstrates. It would be many more years before Germany felt like one people again and some would argue the scars are still healing.

 

Further Links:

The Berlin Wall Memorial

Berlin.de : The Berlin Wall (The City of Berlin’s official webportal)

Wikipedia: The Berlin Wall

BBC Radio 4:  Germany: Memories of a Nation  (major series)

Khan Academy: The Cold War

Guardposts and Gardens: Walking the Berlin Wall Trail

Berlin Wall app

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated.  Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week.  The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Bradford University (17 Nov 14)
  • British Library (31 Oct 14)
  • Cambridge University (03 Nov 14)
  • CONSER (19 Nov 14)
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (18 Nov 14)
  • Leicester University (13 Nov 14)
  • Royal Institute of British Architects (04 Nov 14)
  • Royal Society of Medicine (06 Nov 14)
  • Southampton University (16 Nov 14)
  • Swansea University (15 Nov 14)
  • Trinity College Dublin (31 Oct 14)
  • University College London (10 Nov 14)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

Happy World Television Day!

Today (21st November) is World Television Day. This day was declared by the United Nations General Assembly back in 1996 “in recognition of the increasing impact television has on decision-making by bringing world attention to conflicts and threats to peace and security and its potential role in sharpening the focus on other major issues, including economic and social issues�. Here are some light-hearted television-themed weird and wonderful titles found in SUNCAT.

An image of a Hungarian television set from 1959. ORION AT 602 - 1959.

Hungarian television set from 1959. ORION AT 602 – 1959. Creator ‘Takkk’. CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)

  • Good television!.
  • Television puppet show.
  • Actors television credits.
  • Scottish Television : Way ahead.
  • Fortress television guide.
  • British television advertising craft awards.
  • Kill your television.
  • Starburst : the annual of cinema & television fantasy.
  • Picture box : independent television for schools.
  • Zerb the journal for the Guild of Television Cameramen
  • The effects of television on college football attendance.
  • Closed-circuit television as a medium of instruction.
  • Velvet Light Trap: A Critical Journal of Film & Television.
  • Film for Television – Alive or Dead.
  • Epi-log : the television magazine of science fiction, fantasy, and adventure.
  • The messy media : a symposium on the state of radio and television.
  • Frames of Mind: A Post-Jungian Look at Cinema, Television & Technology.
  • Afternoon TV.
  • Who does what in ITV and Channel Four and breakfast-time television.
  • 405 alive : recalling the golden years of black & white television.
  • Shop talk : the magazine for tv shopping fans.
  • Soaps : dishing out the dirt on all your TV regulars.
  • CBS’ watch! : your eye on entertainment.
  • Televisual Bulldog awards.
  • Zap.
  • ETV : emergency television.
  • Conspiracy TV.
  • Interactive Television Association hotline.
  • Show & tel.
  • Bad news Glasgow University Media Group.
  • We love telly!

For more TV serials and other weird and wonderful titles take a look in SUNCAT.

Jisc MediaHub support

As the new academic year is well underway, we thought it would be a good time to remind you of the various ways that you can find help and support for using Jisc MediaHub.

There is a support section within the service, with PDF guides, a guided tour and a set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

 

YouTube channel

Jisc MediaHub also has a YouTube channel with some short videos on using the service. We have just published a new video, Explore Jisc MediaHub, with some examples of the Explore pages available in the service – have a look:

Watch on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1xlwzZg

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Webinars

We run short webinars to introduce users to the service.

The next introductory webinar is on Wednesday 11 February 2015 – click here for more details and registration.

A recent webinar is available to view – watch on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1qzUWxl

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Help us improve our support

We’re trying to improve the support that we offer you. New help pages are in development, along with some more short videos.

It would be great to hear from you if you have any other ideas on support that would be useful. More videos, webinars, guides or anything else you can think of – just let us know and we’ll endeavour to provide it!

You can email us your suggestions at edina@ed.ac.uk, or leave a comment below.

SUNCAT feature library: Religious Society of Friends

This is the eighth in the series of guest posts written by one of SUNCAT’s Contributing Libraries. This month, Jennifer Milligan, Senior Library Assistant at the Library of the Religious Society of Friends, writes about the library, its serials collection, and being a SUNCAT Contributing Library.

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The Library of the Religious Society of Friends has one of the largest collections of materials in the world relating to Quakers and their activities. As well as the central archives of Britain Yearly Meeting, it also holds printed material, manuscripts , pictures and museum objects.

Image of the Library of the Society of Friends Reading Room

The Library of the Society of Friends Reading Room

The Library was founded in 1673 when the Second Day Morning Meeting agreed to acquire two copies of everything written by Quakers and one copy of everything written against them.

The Library now holds about 1000 periodical titles and currently receives about 250 current titles. Many of these are only available in the UK at this Library or the Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre in Birmingham. The Library’s collection of periodicals covers Quakerism and matters with which Friends have been concerned. This includes Friends organisations (such as the Friends Ambulance Unit), special interest groups (such as Quaker Action on Alcohol and Drugs and its predecessors) and informal groups. Its holdings go back to 1780 with the first Ackworth School annual reports.

An image of a page of the First Annual Report of the Friends Ambulance Unit (1914-1919).

The First Annual Report of the Friends Ambulance Unit (1914-1919).

The Library also holds historically rare and important titles such as William Allen’s ‘The Philanthropist’ and ‘The Monthly Record’ and journals of various Friends missions in places such as Pemba, Tanzania and Madagascar.
It also collects serials produced by organisations with which Friends have traditionally had strong links, such as the Central Board of Conscientious Objectors and the Anti-Slavery Society, and titles connected to Friends testimonies, such as Peace News.

Image of a page from the UK's first anti-racist publication 'Anti Caste'.

Anti Caste (ed. Catherine Impey) , the UK’s first anti-racist publication. The Library holds the only complete set known to have survived in this country.

The Library contacted SUNCAT about the possibility of us submitting our serials holdings and in October 2011 I was delighted to be approached to do this.  The Library uses ADLIB which means our records are not set out in UKMARC format. However, I was reassured by staff at SUNCAT that this would not be an issue as they had uploaded records from other collections using ADLIB. We also do not use Library of Congress subject headings and set out our authority file information such as corporate authors differently. I was again reassured that this would not be an issue. I sent some examples of our serials records for consideration. I was advised as to what fields would be required and how the data should be set out.

I uploaded the records using FTP and it was an incredibly quick and simple process. I checked with the staff that they had received the records. By February 2012, our holdings had been uploaded to the main SUNCAT catalogue. I was extremely pleased with SUNCAT’s staff swift work and the quality of the records. I have sent two updates to SUNCAT since the initial upload.

The Library has also found SUNCAT a useful tool for helping to locate titles in other collections. We are able to advise readers who are not able to visit the Library in person where the location is of the nearest collection that holds an item they are interested in consulting in. I personally find the new SUNCAT interface very user friendly. There is evidence that some of our users have been alerted to the existence of a title in our collections because of SUNCAT.

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SUNCAT would like to thank Jennifer for writing this post. If you would like to write a post on your SUNCAT Contributing Library and its serials collections please let us know.

New Ordnance Survey Digimap Licence Agreement

We are pleased to announce that a new Ordnance Survey licence agreement for Digimap is now available.

The new End User Licence Agreement (EULA) can be viewed in the Digimap Help Pages. As part of the new licence arrangements, end users need to agree to the EULA to access the Ordnance Survey data through the Digimap Service. Initially this will need to be done every time you access the collection via a popup after you select an application, however we are working on a new registration system that will mean you only need to do this once.

There is also an updated list of FAQs for the licence.

However, if you have any questions relating to the licence please do not hesitate to contact the Digimap support team.

What’s changed in the new agreement?

See below for key changes. Supplementary information is available from the EULA, the Ordnance Survey website and the EDINA helpdesk.

1. The following new products have been introduced to the Digimap Ordnance Survey collection under the new licence:

  • OS MasterMap® Integrated Transport Network Layerâ„¢ (ITN) Layer Urban Paths Theme.
  • OS MasterMap® Topography Layer will also contain the Sites Layer.
  • OS Terrain® 5, introduced as the new high resolution height dataset, replacing Land-Form PROFILE®.
  • PointX Points of Interest (PoI).

These will be made available through the Digimap service as soon as possible.

2. Changes to image publication size restrictions for external use

Image publication size restrictions have changed significantly with many being removed. Please refer to the Your Obligation/Restrictions section of the EULA, specifically Clause 5.1.4 and 5.2.

3. Public sector data sharing rights

In certain situations, it is now possible for you to share Digimap Ordnance Survey data with government departments and for government departments to share their Ordnance Survey data with you. For further details please see FAQs 27 & 28 in Licence FAQ section and consult the EULA Clause 4.

4. Authorised Data Handler

Where a Digimap Authorised User needs to use Ordnance Survey data in a secure data service, the new Digimap Licence now permits that via a separate Digimap Data Handler Agreement. Please see EULA Clause 3.1.4.

5. Educational navigation product/service

For Educational Use, you are now permitted to build Educational navigation apps. See the EULA, Clause 3.4 for the scope of what is permitted.

6. Use of YouTube and Twitter

You may now publish Ordnance Survey data, in line with strict terms detailed in EULA Clause 5, on YouTube and Twitter.

7. There is a change in the copyright notice that must be included on any maps

You must include the following acknowledgements on any display or reproduction of the Ordnance Survey Licensed data:

© Crown Copyright and Database Right [insert date]. Ordnance Survey (Digimap Licence)

Where the date to be inserted should be the current year.

 

For HE institutions:

If you are responsible for your HE institution subscribing to Digimap Ordnance Survey Collection you should already have received an email from Jisc Collections detailing how your institution can agree to the new Sub-Licence. Full details can be found on the Jisc Collections website.

 

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2020 schools and rising!

Over the weekend the number of schools subscribing to Digimap for Schools broke the 2000 barrier! This jump in subscriptions is a result of all primaries in West Lancashire taking out a subscription. Interestingly it’s not Geography that is the driver behind this whole of authority sign up, rather it’s for school sport and in particular, orienteering, where interest has come about. School sport in West Lancashire is delivered by the West Lancashire School Sport Partnership. Their Partnership Development Manager, Mark Forster, says ‘I manage PE and School Sport across a cluster of primary schools and plan to deliver a programme of Orienteering to the schools. One of the barriers to this is the absence of a high quality orienteering map for each school. Digimap for Schools would not only support us to develop orienteering maps but I have been impressed by the other potential cross curricular opportunities it can provide schools’. Mark has offered to undertake a case study of the impact the service has in West Lancashire primary schools.  We are thrilled to have these new primaries join us and look forward to working with Mark and sharing the case study with you.

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated.  Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week.  The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Bristol University (10 Nov 14)
  • Cardiff University (31 Oct 14)
  • CONSER (12 Nov 14)
  • Queen Mary, University of London (15 Oct 14)
  • Queen’s University Belfast (03 Nov 14)
  • Southampton University (09 Nov 14)
  • Strathclyde University (23 Oct 14)
  • Sussex University (07 Nov 14)
  • Swansea University (15 Oct 14)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

Visualising OS MasterMap® Topography Layer Building Height Attribute in AutoCAD Map 3D and InfraWorks

We’ve recently written blogs on visualising OS MasterMap® Topography Layer Building Height Attribute (BHA) data in ESRI’s ArcGIS and ArcGlobe and also QGIS. These blogs have proved very popular so we have written a 3rd instalment on how to achieve similar results using Autodesk products using AutoCAD Map3D and InfraWorks.

Please see the previous post for information on BHA data coverage, an explanation of the different height attributes supplied by Ordnance Survey (OS) and for details of further information sources; including the excellent Getting Started Guide produced by OS. Please remember this is an alpha release of the data and OS do not guarantee that BHA is error free or accurate. Additionally the dataset is not yet subject to update and maintenance.

Getting Started

Download the following datasets for your area of interest from Digimap using the OS Data Download application:

  1. OS MasterMap® Topography Layer: select ‘GML’ as the format for your data rather than ‘DWG’ as we need to get to some of the raw data values stored in the GML file, and limit your download to just the Buildings using the Layers drop-down in the basket.
  2. OS Terrainâ„¢ 50 DTM: this will be used as the base (surface) heights for the area;
  3. BHA data (BHA data is found in the ‘OS MasterMap’ group): select CSV as the format;
  4. Optionally download any additional data you may wish to use as a backdrop draped over the DTM surface, in this example we’re going to use OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster but other datasets could be used.

Preparing BHA data for use

If your downloaded BHA data is made up of more than one CSV file we recommend merging them all together in to a single CSV file first to make subsequent processing easier and quicker. Use a text editor such as Notepad or TextPad rather than Excel, as Excel can change the formatting of numbers which contain leading zeros.

Each object in MasterMap Topography Layer has a unique identifier called a Topographic Identifier, or TOID for short. TOIDs supplied by OS take the format of a 13 or 16 digit number prefixed with ‘osgb’ e.g. ‘osgb1000039581300′ or ‘osgb1000002489201973′. Some applications, including AutoCAD Map 3D , automatically strip off the ‘osgb’ prefix and add three leading zeros to any TOID that has only 13 digits to make them all 16 characters long. In order to make it easier to join BHA data to building features in MasterMap® Topography Layer the BHA files supplied by EDINA have two TOID values:

  • os_topo_toid_digimap is the TOID formatted to match TOIDs in AutoCAD Map 3D, ArcGIS and in the File Geodatabase format supplied through Digimap.
  • os_topo_toid is the original TOID as supplied by Ordnance Survey

You should check the TOID values in your MasterMap data and those in the BHA data to ensure that there is a common field that you can use to match on; we will use os_topo_toid_digimap as this field in the BHA data matches the TOID values in the MasterMap data when used in AutoCAD Map 3D.

Open the merged CSV file in Excel. To ensure that the data is displayed correctly in Excel you should import the data as follows:

  1. Open a blank Excel document then use the ‘From Text’ option which can be found on the Data ribbon.  This allows you to specify the correct field delimiter and data types for the TOID columns, ensuring they are imported as text fields, show image.
  2. Import the data as a ‘delimited’ file, show image.
  3. Specify ‘Comma’ as your delimiter, show image.
  4. On the Text Import Wizard – Step 3 of 3 window select the first column in the ‘Data Preview’ section and set the ‘Column data format’ to ‘Text’. Repeat this step for the second column. This ensures that Excel treats the two TOID columns as text rather than numbers so doesn’t strip off the leading zero’s from any of the values (which are needed when joining the data to the building features in MasterMap later on), show image.
  5. Press Finish to complete the process, after which your data in Excel should look like the image below with the TOID values in the first column all 16 characters long and including three leading zero characters where necessary:Excel showing TOID values imported as text
  6. AutoCAD Map 3D requires a ‘named range’ of cells to connect to. To create this highlight/select all cells that contain data in the workbook and using the ‘Name Box’ give this selection of cells a name. In the screen grab below we have called the selection ‘BuildingHeightValues’ (note your name cannot include spaces):
    Excel named range
  7. Save your file as an .xslx file.
  8. The next step is to use the Windows ODBC Data Source Administrator to create a connection that points to this .xlsx file. Open the ODBC Data Source Administrator, the easiest way of doing this is to use the Windows search tool to search for ‘ODBC Data Source’.
    ODBC Data Connection Administrator
  9. On the ‘User DSN’ tab press the ‘Add…’ button to create a new ODBC connection:
    Add ODBC Connection
  10. Select ‘Microsoft Excel Driver’ and press the Finish button.
  11. Give your connection a name in the ‘Data Source Name’ field, and using the ‘Select Workbook…’ button browse and select the .xlsx file created above.
    ODBC Select File
  12. Press OK and the newly created User DSN will be listed:
    ODBC Data Source Administrator
  13. Press OK to close the ODBC Data Source Administrator.

Preparing MasterMap Topography Layer GML data for use

  1. Open AutoCAD Map 3D.
  2. At the command prompt type: MAPIMPORT, or select ‘Map Import’ from the Insert menu.
    AutoCAD Map 3D Map Import
  3. Browse to the .gz file downloaded from Digimap, ensure the ‘Files of type’ drop-down is set to ‘OS (GB) Mastermap (*.gml, *.xml, *.gz)’.
    AutoCAD Map 3D Browse
  4. Import just the TopographicArea layer by deselecting all other layers in the import dialog.
    AutoCAD Map 3D Import
  5. Click on the word <None> in the Data Column for the TopographicArea layer.
  6. In the Attribute Data window select ‘Create object data’ and press OK.
    AutoCAD Map 3D Attribute Data
  7. Select ‘Import polygons as closed polylines’ and press OK.
    AutoCAD Map 3D Closed Polylines
  8. The data will be imported in to your current map window. Note you may need to select View > Extents to see the data.
  9. The data needs to be converted to an .sdf file to allow the Building Height Attribute data to be joined to it.
    1. At the command prompt type: MAPEXPORT
    2. Select ‘Autodesk SDF (*.sdf)’ as the file type.
    3. On the Feature Class tab, click on the ‘Select Attributes…’ button.
    4. In the Select Attributes window select ‘Object Data’ and press OK.
      AutoCAD Map 3D Select Attributes
    5. On the Map Export window press OK to export the data.
  10. Connect to the .sdf file just created:
    1. In the Task Pane select Data > Connect to Data…
      AutoCAD Map 3D Connect To Data
    2. Select ‘Add SDF Connection’.
      AutoCAD Map 3D Add SDF Connection
    3. Give your connection a name and browse to the .sdf file exported in the previous step.
    4. Click the Connect button to establish the connection.
    5. Press the ‘Add to Map’ button to add this data to your current map window.
      AutoCAD Map 3D Add to map

You have now added MasterMap buildings to your current map window, the next step is to connect to the Building Height Attribute (Excel spreadsheet) and join it to the building features in MasterMap.

Joining Building Height Attribute to buildings in MasterMap

  1. Connect to the BHA spreadsheet using the ODBC connection:
    1. In the Task Pane select Data > Connect to Data…
    2. Select ‘Add ODBC Connection’
    3. Give your connection a name and select the Data Source Name created above using the ‘…’ button next to the ‘Source’ field.
      AutoCAD Map 3D select DNS
    4. Press the ‘Test Connection’ button.
      AutoCAD Map 3D create ODBC connection
    5. The table in the bottom half of the window will display all named ranges in your spreadsheet, we called our named range ‘BuildingHeightValues’. Before you can select this range for use in AutoCAD Map 3D you need to select a column to use as the ‘Identify Property’. To do this click on the text that says ‘<Click to select>’.
      AutoCAD Map 3D create ODBC connection
    6. In the drop-down that appears put a tick in the box next to the value ‘os_topo_toid_digimap’.
      AutoCAD Map 3D create ODBC connection
    7. Now you can tick the box next to the named range in the spreadsheet and press the ‘Connect’ button.
      AutoCAD Map 3D create ODBC connection
    8. The connection details will be displayed.
      AutoCAD Map 3D create ODBC connection
    9. The Data Connection window can now be closed.
  2. In the Task Pane right click on the MasterMap data and select ‘Create a Join…’
    AutoCAD Map 3D create a join
  3. Join detailsIn the ‘Create a Join’ window:
    1. select the building height data (in the Excel spreadsheet) as the ‘Table (or feature class) to join to’;
    2. select ‘TOID’ in the left hand drop-down menu;
    3. select ‘os_topo_toid_digimap’ in the right hand drop-down menu;
    4. select ‘Keep only left-side records with a match’ in the ‘Type of Join’ section;
    5. press ‘OK’ to create the join.
  4. To verify that the Join has worked, open the data table for the MasterMap data, this is done in the Task Pane by selecting the MasterMap data then pressing the ‘Table’ button. The table will be displayed, scroll to the right to see the joined building height values:
    AutoCAD Map 3D attribute table
  5. The final step is to export the joined data as a new .sdf file which we can then visualise in 3D in InfraWorks. This is done by either right clicking on the MasterMap layer in the Task Pane and selecting ‘Export Layer Data to SDF…’ or by using the ‘Export to SDF’ function on the ‘Vector Layer’ ribbon in the ‘Save’ group.

Visualising the data in 3D using Autodesk InfraWorks

So far we have downloaded OS MasterMap® Topography Layer and BHA data for the same area and joined the two together to create a new dataset containing just the building features which now include the various height attributes published by OS. We also downloaded additional data to use as a backdrop draped over the DTM surface, in this example we will use OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster, but OS VectorMap® Local Raster or OS 1:25,000 Scale Colour Raster would also be suitable depending on the scale of your study area.

Visualising the data in 3D is achieved using Autodesk’s InfraWorks product . The steps below describe how to use the application to create a 3D model:

  1. Open InfraWorks and create a new model.
  2. Specify a location to save the model and give it a name:
    InfraWorks New Model
  3. Click and drag the OS Terrain 50 DTM in to InfraWorks; the file to drag is the one with the .asc extension.
  4. In the Data Source Configuration window, ensure the Type is set to ‘Terrain’ and Coordinate System is set to ‘BritishNatGrid’:
    InfraWorks Data Source DTM
  5. Press the ‘Close & Refresh’ button; the DTM should be displayed:
    InfraWorks showing DTM only
  6. Click and drag the final .sdf file created in the final step of the previous section which contains the heighted building data (i.e. the .sdf file created after joining the MasterMap buildings to the Building Height Attribute data spreadsheet).
  7. In the Data Source Configuration window, set the ‘Type’ drop-down to ‘Buildings’ and select a suitable ‘Roof Height’ attribute using the drop-down on the Common tab. As with previous blogs we have used the RelH2 attribute as we found this gave the best overall representation of building heights relative to each other:
    Data source configuration
  8. On the ‘Geo Location’ tab select ‘BritishNatGrid’ as the coordinate system:
    Data source configuration
  9. On the Source tab select ‘Drape’ from the drop-down under the ‘Draping Options’:
    Data source configuration
  10. Press the ‘Close & Refresh’ button, the buildings should now be displayed on top of the DTM, you may need to pan or zoom to view the data:

    InfraWorks with 3d buildings draped over OS Terrain50

    OS Terrain™ 50 with buildings from OS MasterMap® Topography Layer extruded on top using Building Height Attribute data.

  11. To give some more context to the visualisation you can drape additional raster layers on top of the DTM such as OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster. This is done by selecting all the raster files and dragging them in to the InfraWorks window.
  12. In the Data Source Configuration window ensure ‘Type’ is set to ‘Ground Imagery’, and one the ‘Geo Location’ tab select the ‘BritishNatGrid’ Coordinate System:
  13. Select the ‘Close & Refresh’ button and the map data will be draped over the DTM surface:

    Infraworks with Terrain50 DTM, MasterMap 1:2,500 Raster and Heighted Buidlings

    OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster draped on top of OS Terrain™ 50, with buildings from OS MasterMap® Topography Layer extruded on top using Building Height Attribute data.

The finished visualisation

The screen grab below shows the final visualisation centred on Biggar using OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster as the surface layer.

InfraWorks visualisation

OS MasterMap® 1:2,000 Raster draped on top of OS Terrain™ 50, with buildings from OS MasterMap® Topography Layer extruded on top using Building Height Attribute data.

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