Higher Resolution Videos on Jisc MediaHub

We are pleased to announce that enhanced video is  now available for many of the subscription collections in Jisc MediaHub. These include over 23,000 videos from AP Archive, Getty (moving images),  IET.tv, ITV News and a subset of Wellcome Library videos. There are a further 37,100  videos from content originally delivered via NewsFilm Online.

The video was originally delivered at a low resolution, based on a specification created for the old Film and Sound Online and NewsFilm Online services. By transcoding these videos into formats suitable for the web, EDINA can now deliver high resolution up to 480p (equivalent to high definition television or DVD quality)  showcasing the high-quality media available from Jisc eCollections.

When will this enhanced video be included in Jisc MediaHub?

Transcoding at 480p is complete for AP Archive, Getty (moving images), IET.tv and ITV News and these are now available.

Transcoding the NewsFilm Online videos is underway and we hope to complete this by the end of October 2014.  The Wellcome Library videos will be made available as soon as possible later on in the year.

What changes will I notice when I use Jisc MediaHub?

Where video has been enhanced you will notice the video on the full record page will appear larger and clearer. This is due to a 178% increase in image area of each video which will be transmitted at a bit rate of 2Mb/s.

 

 

Before Enhanced Resolution

Before Enhanced Resolution

 

After Enhanced Resolution

After Enhanced Resolution

 

 

 

1 Sept 2014 updated roadmap

Current developments

  • MediaHub Mobile App (iOS – for iPhone/iPad).
  • More detailed usage statistics, including a COUNTER Multimedia report.
  • HTML User guides.
  • Enhanced tool to upload images.

Under Consideration

  • Users can create and share their own Media Trails.
  • Embedding video and audio content from MediaHub in web pages.
  • Interoperability with reading list software.
  • Plugins for VLEs including Moodle.
  • MediaHub Mobile App for Android.
  • Linking to related material in other online services, such as the Jorum Learning Objects Repository.
  • Simplifying the login process and adding institutional login URLs (“targeted URLsâ€�) that direct users via the preferred log in mechanism, direct to media items.
  • Users can contribute moving images and sound through an embedded YouTube.
  • Refine Content-Development Strategy.
  • Bulk uploading as well as existing uploading of individual images.

Delivered

September 2014
  • Filtering of Collections by ‘attribute’ e.g. exploring only Jisc-licensed content or only content that requires no login.
  • Suggested formats for citing video, audio and images.
  • Improved service resilience.
  • Higher quality video.
January 2014
  • Advanced Search: Updated interface, including sort by proximity.
  • Users can contribute content.
  • Crowd-sourcing metadata.
  • Zoom tool for images.
April  2013
  • Simpler classification of collection types.
  • Advanced Search: time/date, people.
  • My MediaHub: bookmarking, commenting, tagging.
September 2012
  • Explore by Place.
  • Embedding of MediaHub search into your website.
August 2012
  • Explore Newsfilm.
December 2011
  • Explore by Learning Materials: now including Reviews.
  •  Interactive Guided Tour accessible via the Help page.
  • New metadata and better display of data on Full Record Page.
  • Improved Display of Brief Records Page.
October 2011
  • Personal preferences in My MediaHub.
  • Combining and re-running previous searches in My MediaHub.
  • “Show allâ€� similar and recently viewed items.
  • Searches that match any one or more words.
  • Help guides.
August 2011
  • Advanced Search: title/description, subject, media type, collection and collection type indexes.
  • Most Popular: Items, searches.
  • My MediaHub: search history, recently viewed items, marked items.
  • Sharing and social networking via external services such as Twitter.
  • Machine-to-machine interface: SRU and OAI-PMH.
June 2011
  • Explore by Subject.
  • Explore by Collection.
  • Explore by Time.

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Bath University (21 Aug 14)
  • CONSER (27 Aug 14)
  • Edinburgh University (21 Aug 14)
  • Institution of Civil Engineers (21 Aug 14)
  • Liverpool University (22 Aug 14)
  • Newcastle University (22 Aug 14)
  • Oxford University (22 Aug 14)
  • Sheffield Hallam University (15 Aug 14)
  • Southampton University (24 Aug 14)
  • University of the West of England (UWE) (23 Aug 14)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

Retiral of the original SUNCAT interface

We announced back in November 2012 that we would be developing a new SUNCAT interface and have posted a number of items about the development along the way. Now, following the positive feedback on the new interface from the last survey, we would like to retire the original SUNCAT interface at the end of next month on Friday 26th September.

The original interface was went live as a pilot service in early 2005, and proved to be popular for it’s simplicity and ease of use, but we hope you agree that the new interface represents a significant improvement and modernisation of the SUNCAT service.

We would be grateful if you could move to using the new interface, if you haven’t already, as soon as possible and also if you could update any bookmarks accordingly. The address for the homepage of the new service remains as http://suncat.ac.uk.

One feature which will no longer be available is the Google search gadget (http://www.google.com/ig/directory?synd=open&url=http://www.suncat.ac.uk/ig/suncat-search.xml). We understand that Google will not support this in the long term so we have not updated this to work with the new interface. If, however, there is sufficient interest we would be happy to investigate providing an alternative as a future development.

Please also contact us as soon as possible via the EDINA Helpdesk at edina@ed.ac.uk if you have any queries or concerns about this or the switch off of the original interface in general.

New term, new mapping data

Over summer, the Digimap for Schools team have been beavering away processing updated Ordnance Survey mapping for the annual data update.   Every year, we take updates from Ordnance Survey and put them into Digimap for Schools, so recent changes in your area may now be on the maps.

The mapping is all 2014 data, the specific month for each product is:

MasterMap May 2014
VectorMap Local Raster July 2014
1:25 000 Raster April 2014
1:50 000 Raster June 2014
1:250 000 Raster June 2014
MiniScale January 2014

National Dog Day!

In the United States today (26th August) it is National Dog Day! Here, at SUNCAT, we appreciate man’s best friend and in honour of all canines we have compiled a weird and wonderful list of dog-related titles. Below is also an image of the statue of Greyfriars Bobby, a very popular tourist attraction here in Edinburgh.

Statue of Greyfriars Bobby found in Edinburgh.

Statue of Greyfriars Bobby, Edinburgh – taken by Michael Reeve. CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)

  • Earth dog – running dog.
  • Natural dog.
  • Dusty dog.
  • Good dog!
  • Bottom Dog.
  • Pale dog.
  • Mad dog.
  • Action dog.
  • The Flying dog.
  • Modern dog.
  • Dog & driver / International Sled Dog Racing Association.
  • Space dog.
  • The Dog fancier.
  • International dog fancy.
  • Jughead’s pal Hot Dog.
  • The whole dog journal.
  • Bulldog Reporter’s Daily Dog.
  • Desert dog news.
  • Stray dog almanac.
  • Rex the Wonder Dog.
  • Dog watch : a weekly newspaper for the purebred dog fancy.
  • Clifford the Big Red Dog.
  • Black bob, the dandy wonder dog.
  • Eukanuba : the magazine that understands your dog.
  • The butcher’s dog is always barking.
  • Have dog will travel : Oregon, Washington, Idaho / Barbara Whitaker.
  • Off-lead : the national dog training monthly.
  • The scurvy dog : the bedtime companion for the uninhibited youngster.
  • The Tail-Wagger.

For more dog titles and other weird and wonderful serials take a look in the new and improved SUNCAT.

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • CONSER (20 Aug 14)
  • Cranfield University (20 Aug 14)
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (13 Aug 14)
  • Essex University (18 Aug 14)
  • Glasgow School of Art (18 Aug 14)
  • ISSN (13 Aug 14)
  • National Library of Scotland (19 Aug 14)
  • Queen Mary, University of London (15 Aug 14)
  • Reading University (18 Aug 14)
  • Scottish National Gallery Research Library (20 Aug 14)
  • Southampton University (17 Aug 14)
  • Sussex University (14 Aug 14)
  • Swansea University (15 Aug 14)
  • University College London (11 Aug 14)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

Mapping Supply Chains for 19th Century Leather

Impression of a Buenos Aires slaughterhouse by Charles Pellegrini, 1829.

[First Published on the NiCHE Website] By Andrew Watson with Jim Clifford For the past two weeks I’ve been in Saskatoon, working with Jim Clifford in the University of Saskatchewan’s Historical Geographic Information Systems (HGIS) Lab. Since January 2014 I’ve been working with Jim and Colin Coates on the Trading Consequences research project thinking about how historians can use these valuable new text mining, database and visualization tools to understand the economic and environmental histories of global commodity flows during the nineteenth century. This trip to Saskatchewan has allowed Jim and I to focus our energies on using Trading Consequences for historical research. We used text-mined spatial data in conjunction with trade statistics and textual sources as a means of testing the search results and functionality of Trading Consequences. To do this, we chose a case study: the history of leather tanning related commodities during the nineteenth century.

Neckinger Leather Mills  Wellcome Images on Flickr Creative Commons by-nc-nd 2.0 UK

Neckinger Leather Mills Wellcome Images on Flickr Creative Commons by-nc-nd 2.0 UK

We chose leather tanning for our case study because this topic intersects with both our research interests. Jim is interested in how industrial development across London, including the leather district of Bermondsey, contributed to broader environmental transformations through the development of global commodity flows. Part of my recently completed doctoral research examined the economic and environmental dimensions of hemlock bark harvesting for leather tanneries in Muskoka, Ontario during the same time period. Trading Consequences provides the opportunity to learn more about the ways tanneries in Muskoka and London functioned as part of transnational networks in hides, tannins and leather. Apart from some primary and secondary source background reading, our work over these initial two weeks of research on this project focused almost exclusively on exploring nineteenth century trade statistics for Britain and, to a lesser extent, the United States. Theses statistics came mainly from the Annual Statement of the Trade of the United Kingdom with Foreign Countries and British Possessions, which the HGIS Lab’s research assistant, Stephen Langlois, entered into a Commodity Flows database. With the help of Jon Bath, Director of the Digital Research Centre at U Sask, Jim and I exported the statistics from the Commodity Flows database to create spreadsheets, graphs and maps, which we used to help us understand broad patterns and trends in the global trade of leather tanning commodities during the nineteenth century. One of the tools we used to start to get a sense of the transnational connections of these commodities is SourceMap.com, a web-based supply chain mapping service, that allows users to generate maps populated with directional flow information. Using the information from the Commodity Flows database related to where commodities originated as well as their destination, Jim created four maps representing the flow of leather tanning related commodities at different points in the nineteenth century.

Read More on the NiCHE Website

SUNCAT’s new Contributing Library – Royal Veterinary College

We are pleased to announce that just over 750 serials records of the Royal Veterinary College have just been loaded into SUNCAT. This makes six new Contributing Libraries added so far in 2014. This addition brings the total number of libraries to 98, plus the CONSER database, the ISSN register and the Directory of Open Access Journals.

The Royal Veterinary College is one of the world’s leading specialist veterinary institutions. Founded in 1791, the RVC has a unique heritage of innovation in veterinary and biomedical sciences, clinical practice and education.

The RVC Library is divided between two sites; Camden, located in central London, and Hawkshead, located near Potters Bar, just north of the M25. Both are intended primarily for use by students and staff of The Royal Veterinary College, but external visitors may consult the libraries’ stock by prior arrangement only.

The material at Camden reflects the pre-clinical and taught post-graduate courses there, while the Hawkshead stock covers the clinical and taught post-graduate courses at that site. Most veterinary material is at Hawkshead.
The RVC Library is a member of the M25 Consortium of Higher Education Libraries. Other members who are SUNCAT Contributing Libraries include: Courtauld Institute of Art; London Metropolitan University; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Senate House Libraries; The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide; Wellcome Library.

For further information and news about SUNCAT please see our website, follow SUNCAT on Twitter (@suncatteam), or contact the EDINA helpdesk at edina@ed.ac.uk.

SUNCAT’s new Contributing Library – Royal Veterinary College

We are pleased to announce that just over 750 serials records of the Royal Veterinary College have just been loaded into SUNCAT. This makes six new Contributing Libraries added so far in 2014. This addition brings the total number of libraries to 98, plus the CONSER database, the ISSN register and the Directory of Open Access Journals.

The Royal Veterinary College is one of the world’s leading specialist veterinary institutions. Founded in 1791, the RVC has a unique heritage of innovation in veterinary and biomedical sciences, clinical practice and education.

The RVC Library is divided between two sites; Camden, located in central London, and Hawkshead, located near Potters Bar, just north of the M25. Both are intended primarily for use by students and staff of The Royal Veterinary College, but external visitors may consult the libraries’ stock by prior arrangement only.

The material at Camden reflects the pre-clinical and taught post-graduate courses there, while the Hawkshead stock covers the clinical and taught post-graduate courses at that site. Most veterinary material is at Hawkshead.
The RVC Library is a member of the M25 Consortium of Higher Education Libraries. Other members who are SUNCAT Contributing Libraries include: Courtauld Institute of Art; London Metropolitan University; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Senate House Libraries; The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide; Wellcome Library.

For further information and news about SUNCAT please see our website, follow SUNCAT on Twitter (@suncatteam), or contact the EDINA helpdesk at edina@ed.ac.uk.