SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service this week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • British Library (21 Jul 16)
  • British Museum Library (06 Jul 16)
  • CONSER (20 Jul 16)
  • Exeter University (01 Jul 16)
  • London Business School (04 Jul 16)
  • London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (05 Jul 16)
  • National Coal Mining Museum for England (01 Jul 16)
  • Natural History Museum (01 Jul 16)
  • Nottingham University (05 Jul 16)
  • Open University (01 Jul 16)
  • Queen’s University Belfast (03 Jul 16)
  • Royal Society of Medicine (01 Jul 16)
  • Southampton University (17 Jul 16)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.


New Digimap Home Page for the new Academic Year

We have been hard at work developing a fresh new look for Digimap which we will be launching for the new academic year. Here is a sneak preview, though please note that nothing has been finalised just yet:

Digimap Home Page July 2016

The operation of the page remains the same and the layout is almost identical, we have just given it a modern fresh look. We hope you like it!

If you have any questions or require any more information then please feel free to contact us:

  • Phone: 0131 650 3302
  • Email: edina@ed.ac.uk

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Mediahub Service Changes

From 1 September 2016 the MediaHub subscription service will no longer be available. However, all the multimedia content that Jisc has licensed for use by higher and further education institutions, which is currently accessed via the MediaHub subscription, will be made available through a new service, MediaPlus.

MediaPlus will be hosted and delivered to existing, and new, subscribers by Alexander Street, a ProQuest Company with a strong presence in the UK academic sector. All Jisc-licensed news, film, image and music content including high profile collections such as ITN, Getty images and Wellcome Library images and sound will continue to be available to you, but new content, services and benefits will also be included such as Teachers’ TV and other cross-searchable collections, hence the name MedaPlus. The new service will be available at http://mediaplus.alexanderstreet.com on 1st September.

As part of the transition between MediaHub and MediaPlus, during the month of August the current service will still be available with maintenance being kept to a minimum.

For more information about MediaPlus, please contact: mediaplus@alexanderstreet.com.

Supporting E-Journal Archiving: Publishers

In June 2016, EDINA and the ISSN IC hosted a workshop as part of the Keepers Extra project. The event brought together representatives of the archiving agencies and libraries reporting into the Keepers Registry and other key stakeholder such as Research Libraries UK, Coalition for Networked Information and Digital Preservation Coalition, to explore potential international action to increase the preservation coverage of e-serials. Following the face to face discussions, the Keeper agencies were invited to submit prioritised suggestions for actions that would support e-journal archiving. This is one of a series of posts outlining key actions that would support long-term stable access to serial content. 

 

Today publishers not only produce digital serials but also face the additional challenges of managing access and holding content securely over the long term. Archiving agencies support publishers by offering a robust and dependable third party solution for long term storage and back up. This enables publishers to offer assurance of post-cancellation access, and ensures that content would be preserved were the publisher’s platform to cease to exist.  Participation in an archiving initiative is thus an important factor for libraries considering subscription to e-journals. Publishers can support archiving in a number of ways.

Firstly, publishers can join at least one reputable third party archiving agency that reports into the Keepers Registry and promote their participation to customers. In this way, publishers not only contribute financially to the long term sustainability of their content but also help to raise awareness of preservation among their peers, encouraging discussion and understanding of e-journal preservation strategies, risks, and business models among the publisher community.

Secondly, publishers can take preservation requirements into account within their internal workflows and production processes.  Following current guidance to ensure that their publications are created in ways that encourage and enable preservation (i.e. use of certain file types, metadata), and that they are packaged and delivered in standard formats that make them easier to work with.

Thirdly, publishers should be vocal about the importance they place on long term archiving. Publishing societies and membership organisations should promote the value and benefits of archiving among members: these include not only the improved security of content, and long term reputational benefit, but also improved clarity of data and the support and establishment of international data standards.  A strong preservation strategy is a marker of best practice, an indicator of the quality of content and a significant part of any offer to customers.

 

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Supporting E-Journal Archiving: Research Libraries

In June 2016, EDINA and the ISSN IC hosted a workshop as part of the Keepers Extra project. The event brought together representatives of the archiving agencies and libraries reporting into the Keepers Registry and other key stakeholder such as Research Libraries UK, Coalition for Networked Information and Digital Preservation Coalition, to explore potential international action to increase the preservation coverage of e-serials. Following the face to face discussions, the Keeper agencies were invited to submit prioritised suggestions for actions that would support e-journal archiving. This is one of a series of posts outlining key actions that would support long-term stable access to serial content. 

 

Research libraries have traditionally been the collectors and stewards of journals, books and other materials. Their librarians are expert in identifying, selecting, and archiving content of value to the scholarly community and have strong connections with researchers, who rely on stable access to scholarship and publish their work in journals. It is important that such librarians contribute towards shaping the future of the scholarly record, bringing their knowledge, expertise and skills to bear on the challenges that face libraries and archiving agencies alike. Research libraries should promote the value of this work and support their librarians to join the international community engaged in journal archiving. They should view archiving and preservation agencies not only as a form of insurance but also as partners in a shared project.

As a first step, research libraries could commit to supporting the work of e-journal archiving by joining a third party preservation service such as CLOCKSS or Portico, and/or by supporting local or regional hosting initiatives. They can identify clear digital preservation roles and responsibilities within their organization, and embed consideration of long-term access issues in the process of licensing content.

Secondly, research libraries can collaborate with other libraries and archiving agencies to identify and prioritise serials for preservation. For archiving agencies, content identification is a resource-intensive task, especially when it comes to the ‘long tail’ of smaller publishers. Librarians have a broad view of what is being published where, and can greatly assist archives by identifying valuable content and providing this information to archiving agencies.

Thirdly, libraries can advocate for digital archiving and preservation among publishing, research and funding communities. They can raise preservation as a concern during their negotiations with publishers, enquiring about digital preservation arrangements, and making third party hosting a condition of subscription. They can suggest researchers take archival status into account when choosing where they will publish their work.

They can also encourage library associations to promote awareness and understanding of digital preservation through events, publications and training. Only when research librarians feel confident in their knowledge of archiving and preservation are they able to ‘effectively demand archival deposit by publishers’, and ‘educate authors and readers to consider these archiving provisions in evaluating the suitability of journals as durable records of scholarship.’ (Waters, 2005: 3)

 

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Supporting E-journal Archiving: National Libraries

In June 2016, EDINA and the ISSN IC hosted a workshop as part of the Keepers Extra project. The event brought together representatives of the archiving agencies and libraries reporting into the Keepers Registry and other key stakeholder such as Research Libraries UK, Coalition for Networked Information and Digital Preservation Coalition, to explore potential international action to increase the preservation coverage of e-serials. Following the face to face discussions, the Keeper agencies were invited to submit prioritised suggestions for actions that would support e-journal archiving. This is one of a series of posts outlining key actions that would support long-term stable access to serial content. 

National libraries have historically taken a leadership role in identifying, collecting and stewarding content published within their country. Although, like research libraries, they typically have close relationships with the academic community, they are distinguished by their wide ranging contacts across the spectrum of publishers, from large to small, and by the diverse and active communities of interest that they serve. While most national libraries have collection development policies, some are supported by legislation that requires publishers to deposit copies of their content. As a result, although the resources available to them can vary significantly, national libraries are uniquely experienced in collecting ‘long tail’ publishers. Given the international nature of publishing today, and the extent of the ‘long tail’ still to be archived, national libraries are likely to play an important role in ensuring preservation coverage is increased around the world.

National libraries should continue to provide their services to diverse publishers, prioritising local and small publishers whose work may not be easily collected by larger international archiving agencies. Collection of bespoke, non-standard formats is an important aspect of increasing preservation coverage and, like research librarians, national librarians have collection development expertise that can usefully be brought to bear on e-journal archiving. However, there is scope to work collaboratively to reduce duplication of effort. For example, national libraries can report into Keepers Registry to share their data with one another. This would enable easy identification of content being archived by others and enable effort and resource to be targeted efficiently.

National libraries can take an active international leadership role on digital preservation and setting priorities, forge international partnerships, and share knowledge and best practice with their peers. Joining the Keepers community is a first step in this direction. Advocating for archiving is a second step: given their wide ranging contacts, national libraries are well placed to raise the topic with governments, research libraries, and publishers. The can also provide awareness building and training sessions for different stakeholder groups to understand and assess risks and take action

 

Learn how research libraries can support e-journal archiving

Learn how publishers can support e-journal archiving

 

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SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the last week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • British Library (14 Jul 16)
  • CONSER (06 Jul 16)
  • Edinburgh Napier University (01 Jul 16)
  • Kent University (01 Jul 16)
  • King’s College London (01 Jul 16)
  • London School of Economics and Political Science (01 Jul 16)
  • Manchester University (01 Jul 16)
  • Southampton University (10 Jul 16)
  • York University (01 Jul 16)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.


Keepers Network to Tackle Challenges of E-Journal Archiving

 

On the 6th and 7th of June, EDINA and the ISSN International Centre hosted a second international workshop as part of the Jisc-supported Keepers Extra project.  

 

Following on from last September’s Taking the Long View: International Perspectives on E-Journal Archiving, the event provided an opportunity to discuss recent projects and developments in e-journal archiving and focused on exploring potential collaborative activity among the network of organisations reporting into the Keepers Registry. Delegates included representatives of the agencies reporting into the Keepers Registry and other key organisations such as the Coalition for Networked Information, the Digital Preservation Coalition and Research Libraries UK.

The workshop opened with a series of presentations, including overviews of the work of two new ‘Keepers’ who have recently begun reporting their data into the Registry: the Public Knowledge Project , which archives Open Access journals published on the OJS platform, and the Cariniana network, an initiative of  Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology (IBICT).  These were followed by reports from the Keepers Extra project team, who presented the work that had been completed since the first workshop.

One of the main aims of the Keepers Extra project has been to explore the challenge of increasing the archival and preservation coverage of scholarly journals, with a focus on tackling the ‘long tail’ of small publishers.  At the first workshop, it was established that the key barriers to increasing coverage were lack of resources, particularly around publisher participation negotiations and technical set up. In discussion with the agencies, the Keepers Extra project team drew up a series of proposed activities to address these barriers, and then tested the viability of the proposals through a series of consultations. The team found that while archiving agencies themselves often had quite divergent approaches and missions, there were a number of shared challenges around working with other stakeholders, such as publishers and libraries.

Outcomes

The workshop affirmed the value of the Keepers Registry as a tool and locus of community activity and the enthusiasm for knowledge sharing and collaboration which has been evident throughout the Keepers Extra project . The value of coming together to discuss shared challenges was evident, and it was agreed that the group might effectively speak as one on several issues.  Over the next months, a small working group has agreed to collaboratively craft a shared statement, setting out the importance of the Keepers Registry as a community hub, highlighting the progress made in e-journal archiving, and setting out actions now required. It was agreed that regular meetings of the network around the Registry would be useful, and a series of provisional dates were proposed.

participants at the workshop

Keepers Extra Workshop, University of London Institute in Paris, June 7th 2016

 

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European Conference on Social Media (ECSM) 2016 Day Two – LiveBlog

Today I am again at the European Conference on Social Media 2016 and will be liveblogging the sessions. Today is a shorter conference day and I’ll be chairing a session and giving a poster so there may be a few breaks in the blog. As usual these notes are being taken live so any corrections, questions, etc. are very much welcomed. 

Keynote presentation: Dr Sue Greener,University of Brighton Business School, UK – Unlearning Learning with Social Media

I wanted to give you a topic this morning about my topic, which is learning. But not just learning in Higher Education, but also learning in the workplace. I encourage you to tweet throughout, do tweet me @suegonline.

Life is about learned behaviours. We learn habits and once we learn habits, they are hard to unlearn. But at the same time we also love new novel things – that’s why we love social media. You could call this a dichotomy – between habit and the new. A lovely aphorism from Maria de Beausarq: “The power of habit and the charm of novelty are the two adverse forces which explain the follies of mankind”. We see this dichotomy in psychology all the time.

Davis (1999) talks about habit as a barrier to creating thinking and innovation – the idea that “if someone did it this way, they must have had a good reason”. Glaveanu (2012) writes about “habitual creativity” – where expertise and master is brought about through the constant sharpening and adjusting of habitual practice to dynamic changes in context. As in learning a piano, or a language – practising all the time but gradually introducing flourishes and creativity.

Now, you may be wondering about whether this talk is about learning, or about skills… But I think both are very similar. Learning involves a whole range of skills – reading, note taking, evaluation, etc. Learning is a skill and has a degree of both routine and creativity. And learning is not just about those recognisable tasks… And I want to talk about “unlearning”, something that Alvin Toffler talks about in Future Shock, and he talks about 21st Century digital literacy, talking about learning and unlearning. I was started in elearning and the technology. The technology is what we fit around as habit, as mastery, but it’s all about learning. And when I was looking at Toffler’s work, when doing that PhD work, I was worried about learning theory – they all seemed over-engineered, too formal, too linear almost, too structured as pedagogy. I knew that the idea of learning styles – still in the literature and research – but I think of myself as having a learning palate – which I can pick and choose from, I pick the style of learning to suit the context. I personally learn best by learning by watching, by modelling from other people… Yesterday Britt Allan talked about “advertising literacy” and I hadn’t heard that before, but loved that phrase, it made sense to me, and that’s very much how I learn

Bandoura – triple reciprocal determinism – I found theories of learning I understood. He talked about behaviours, and learning from behaviours, and trialling ideas. That idea of not piling learning on learning, but instead about the idea of learning and unlearning, that makes sense. Hefler talks about organisational unlearning – giving it equal weight to learning. Yes, neural networks in the brain accumulates, but they also die away without use… And unlearning is something else.

So, what is unlearning? It is not negative. And it is not about forgetting/the unconcious giving up of knowledge – although it has been seen that way before in the 80s and 90s – we do forget things but that is not what unlearning is. And it is not just replacing the obsolete. But it is a purposive creative process as important as learning. Unlearning is about taking apart the pieces and reconstructing the meaning. It means we can build the foundations of our knowledge. Much under-researched as an area – therefore enticing. Rushmer and Davies (2004) talk about three things: Fading (over time); wiping (enforced from outside – often happens in the workplace, not comfortable); deep unlearning (from individual surprising experience producing inconsistency, changes of value). That deep unlearning can be gradual, or can be about “falling off a cliff” – when we find something surprising and need to decide to change.

And now to social media. Now, I don’t know about you but much of my unlearning takes place on social media. But why? If we go back to 1997, to the early social network 6degrees.com… Since then we have learned to communicate, to exchange information, assessing and evaluating information differently. Information is all around us, and we absorb it in a very social context. So, how much of our learning is from formal courses, and how much is informal learning? Formal learning is the tip of the iceberg, informal learning is bigger and is about rich tacit understanding. As educators we can try to overly control learning, even in e.g. closed facebook groups. But this is learning that benefits from space to work well.

So, informal learning is social and personal and often informal. Bourdieu (1992) talks about a habitus – a mindset – that is enduring but can be transformed by what takes place within and beyond it. Garrick (1998) and Boud (1999) suggested informal interactions with peers are predominent ways of learning at work. Wenger (1998) talks about social participation in the community as key to informal learning. Boud and Middleton (2003) talk about informal learning as being about mastery of organisational processes, negotiating the political and dealing with the atypical – those are things we don’t always embed in the degree process of course. So, how does this all fit with my idea of social media, this DIY media?

When this conference launched in Brighton in 2014 we had a Social Media Showcase with students, employers, academics, and school children. Last year we did a virtual showcase. And this year we did the Big Bang showcase – in a huge showground in Sussex. Over 8000 students from school children – and we were able to have conversations, have vox pops. Out of hundreds of conversations only 10 students did not use social media. And those that were active, they could write a long list (e.g. 8 or 9) of sites they use. My sense is that for this age range these presences are a little like stickers. For these kids informal learning is massive – from peers, from others, from celebrities. At that age perhaps causing a great deal of unlearning. They encounter information in schools but also from peers – which do they choose to trust and engage with? If ever there was a reason for teachers to understand social media, that was it.

At Brighton we have a “switch it on” policy – we ignore this stuff at our peril! You can always ask for devices to be switched off for a few minutes/a task. To exclude those spaces you are turning away and excluding that valuable informal learning, that bigger context. If we want to help people learn, we have to teach them where they are comfortable. And we must help people to evaluate what they see on social media – that is a critical thing for teachers. And social media is not just for kids… We are increasingly joining SnapChat and WhatsApp – less trackable conversations are appealing to older audiences too.

So, back to Rushmer and Davies (2004) and fading… Snapchat is about forgetting, fading. Wiping will be in place in all organisations but we have to think about how to deal more positively with resistance to change. Hislop, Bosley, Coombs and Holland 2013 – who I don’t totally agree with – have a typology of unlearning which is helpful. My thesis is that social media has some particular aspects – it is personal, ubiquitous and high speed. Data is transmitted in a hugely complex route, filtered through sites, through audiences… We have a huge dissemination of a (any) single story. Speed and serendipity are vital features of social media in action. And the experience is intimate – staring into a screen that makes it one-to-one even if in reality it is one-to-many. These interactions can change our mind. They can change our mind in referenda, they can change our mind in many ways. And they can be central to unlearning. That can be for good, and for bad. We will all have great examples of links, of ways we learn through social media. And it is less predictable than mainstream media, you can find surprises, you can catch enthusiasm – and I like to foster that even if I cannot control it!

So, can social media drive deep unlearning? I think all the signs are there. You should make up your own mind.

Q&A

Q1) I am not sure I totally understand what unlearning is… Learning is a process…

A1) I would relate this to the concept of cognitive dissonance – where there are two competing ideas that you must resolve and decide between. In social media I connect with people I like and trust, if they raise an idea that I didn’t previously agree or subscribe to, their raising of it has the ability to influence or change my mind, or at least means I reconsider that issue.

Q2) You talked about habitual creativity, and implied that as you get older you may forget/fade. I saw a presentation a few years back emphasising that you can learn by changing your habits – a walking route for instance.

A2) Absolutely. Things like changing your seat in a lecture theatre, changing a route etc. But social media can really shift your understanding.

Q3) I think you talked about two types of learning that don’t mix together. Many go to universities for the workplace to gather formal skills, that you call back on etc. But that requires some structure. And of course informal learning happens all the time. And the people I

A3) I agree that media stacking and multi tasking is not good… But at the same time in lectures, at conference, I find it useful to reflect, to engage with topics etc. that is very valuable.

Comment) In high school I remember girls knitting and learning too and doing very well.

A3) It is possible, and it is skills that we are developing. I’d agree that it can work, and that it can be helpful for students to be active and engaging rather than passively receiving.

Q4) Thank you for your interesting keynote. How can social media make real change?

A4) I’m not a politician – I wish I was. We have a tool that can strike at the heart of people. It can help form and shape opinion, but that can be bad as well as good…

Introduction to ECSM 2017 

The next conference will be in Vilnius, the capital city in Lithuania. Lithuania is one of three large modern Northern European baltic countries. We are part of EU, NATO, Euro etc. Vilnius has around 550K, and indeed Lithuania has 3 million people. We have a lovely old town, listed by UNESCO. We have technology sectors that we lead in, particularly green tech, and we have the fastest public wi-fi in the world, and third most affordable internet in the EU! People are lovely, well educated, and we speak many languages! We have 14 universities, we have research parks etc. Our campus is on outskirts of the city – but we have Uber and public transport – and the city centre is all walkable on foot. And our campus has excellent facilities and you are very welcome there. We have many researchers working on social technologies, and a journal for social technologies. And, to end, a short video…

And, on that lovely video, I am pausing the liveblog as I’ll be giving my poster on the Digital Footprint MOOC. Normal service will resume afterwards.

Further details of sessions attended to follow.

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