Digimap Webinar: Urban map data in CAD 15 March 1:30pm

Digimap are running a free webinar, on Wednesday 15th March between 1-1:30pm. The webinar is likely to be of interest to architecture staff and students, who use detailed Ordnance Survey urban map data in AutoCAD. We will: Show you how to download Ordnance Survey map data from Digimap AutoCAD: Discuss issues relating to the use […]

Making Edinburgh the First Global City of Learning – Prof. Jonathan Silvertown Liveblog

This afternoon I am delighted to be at the Inaugeral Lecture of Prof. Jonathan Silvertown from the School of Biological Sciences here at the University of Edinburgh.

Vice Chancellor Tim O’Shea is introducing Jonathan, who is Professor of Evolutionary Ecology and Chair in Technology Enhanced Science Education, and who came to Edinburgh from the Open University.

Now to Jonathan:

Imagine an entire city turned into an interactive learning environment. Where you can learn about the birds in the trees, the rock beneath your feet. And not just learn about them, but contribute back to citizen science, to research taking place in and about the city. I refer to A City of Learning… As it happens Robert Louis Stevenson used to do something similar, carrying two books in their pocket: one for reading, one for writing. That’s the idea here. Why do this in Edinburgh? We have the most fantastic history, culture and place.

Edinburgh has an increadible history of enlightenment, and The Enlightenment. Indeed it was said that you could, at one point, stand on the High Street and shake the hands of 50 men of genius. On the High Street now you can shake Hume (his statue) by the toe and I shall risk quoting him: “There is nothing to be learned from a professor which is not to be met within books”. Others you might have met then include Joseph Black, and also James Hutton, known as the “father of modern geology” and he walked up along the crags and a section now known as “Huttons section” (an unconformity to geologists) where he noted sandstone, and above it volcanic rock. He interpreted this as showing that rocks accumulate by ongoing processes that can be observed now. That’s science. You can work out what happened in the past by understanding what is happening now. And from that he concluded that the earth was more than 6000 years old, as Bishop Usher had calculated. In his book The Theory of the Earth he coined this phrase “No vestige of a beginning, no prospect of an end”. And that supported the emerging idea of evolutionary biology which requires a long history to work. That all happened in Edinburgh.

Edinburgh also has a wealth of culture. It is (in the New Town) a UNESCO World Heritage site. Edinburgh has the Fringe Festival, the International Festival, the Book Festival, the Jazz Festival… And then there is the rich literary heritage of Edinburgh – as J.K. Rowling says “Its impossible to live in Edinburgh without sensing it’s literary heritage”. Indeed if you walk in the Meadows you will see a wall painting celebrating The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. And you can explore this heritage yourself through the LitLong Website and App. He took thousands of books with textmining and a gazeteer of Edinburgh Places, extracting 40,000 snippets of text associated with pinpoints on the map. And you can do this on an app on your phone. Edinburgh is an extraordinary place for all sorts of reasons…

And a place has to be mapped. When you think of maps these days, you tend to think of Google. But I have something better… Open Street Map is to a map what Wikipedia is to the Encyclopedia Britannica. So, when my wife and I moved into a house in Edinburgh which wasn’t on Ordnance Survey, wasn’t on Google Maps, but was almost immediately on OpenStreetMap. It’s Open because there are no restrictions on use so we can use it in our work. Not all cities are so blessed… Geographic misconceptions are legion, if you look at one of th emaps in the British Library you will see the Cable and Wireless Great Circle Map – a map that is both out of date and prescient. It is old and outdated but does display the cable and wireless links across the world… The UK isn’t the centre of the globe as this map shows, wherever you are standing is the centre of the globe now. And Edinburgh is international. At least year’s Edinburgh festival the Deep Time event projected the words “Welcome, World” just after the EU Referendum. Edinburgh is a global city, University of Edinburgh is a global university.

Before we go any further I want to clarify what I mean by learning when I talk about making a city of learning… Kolb (1984) is “How we transform experience into knowledge”, it is learning by discovery. And, wearing my evolutionary hat, it’s a major process of human adaptation. Kolb’s learning cycle takes us from Experience, to Reflect (observe), Conceptualise (Ideas), Experiment (Test), and back to Experience. It is of course also the process of scientific discovery.

So, lets apply that cycle of learning to iSpot, to show how that experiential learning and discovery and what extraordinary things that can do. iSpot is designed to crowdsource the identification of organisms (see Silvertown, Harvey, Greenwood, Dodd, Rosewell, Rebelo, Ansine, McConway 2015). If I see “a white bird” it’s not that exciting, but if I know its a Kittywake then that’s interesting – has it been seen before? Are they nesting elsewhere? You can learn more from that. So you observe an orgnism, you reflect, you start to get comment from others.

So, we have over 60,000 registered users of iSpot, 685k observations, 1.3 million photos, and we have identified over 30,000 species. There are many many stories contained within that. But I will share one of these. So this observation came in from South Africa. It was a picture of some seeds with a note “some children in Zululand just ate some of these seeds and are really ill”. 35 seconds later someone thousands of miles away in Capetown, others agreed on the id. And the next day the doctor who posted the image replied to say that the children were ok, but that it happens a lot and knowing what plant they were from helps them to do something. It wasn’t what we set this up to do but that’s a great thing to happen…

So, I take forward to this city of learning, the lessons of a borderless community; the virtuous circle of learning which empowers and engages people to find out more; and encourage repurposing – use the space as they want and need (we have added extra functions to support that over time in iSpot).

Learning and discovery lends itself to research… So I will show you two projects demonstrating this which gives us lessons to take forward into Edinburgh City of Learning. Evolution Megalab.org was created at the Open University to mark Darwins double centenary in 2009, but we also wanted to show that evolution is happening right now in your own garden… So the snails in your garden have colours and banding patterns, and they have known genetic patterns… And we know about evolution in the field. We know what conditions favour which snails. So, we asked the public to help us test the hypothesis about the snails. So we had about 10,000 populations of snails captured, half of which was there already, half of which was contributed by citizens over a single year. We had seen, over the last 50 years, an increase in yellow shelled snails which do not warm up too quickly. We would expect brown snails further north, yellow snails further south. So was that correct? Yes and No. There was an increase in sanddunes, but not elsewhere. But we also saw a change in patterns of banding patterns, and we didn’t know why… So we went back to pre Megalab data and that issue was provable before, but hadn’t previously been looked for.

Lessons from Megalab included that all can contribute, that it must be about real science and real questions, and that data quality matters. If you are ingenious about how you design your project, then all people can engage and contribute.

Third project, briefly, this is Treezilla, the monster map of trees – which we started in 2014 just before I came here – and the idea is that we have a map of the identity, size and location of trees and, with that, we can start to look at ecosystem impact of these trees, they capture carbon, they can ameliorate floods… And luckily my colleague Mike Dodd spotted some software that could be used to make this happen. So one of the lessons here is that you should build on existing systems, building projects on top of projects, rather than having to happen at the same time.

So, this is the Edinburgh Living Lab, and this is a collaboration between schools and the kinds of projects they do include bike counters and traffic – visualised and analysed – which gives the Council information on traffic in a really immediate way that can allow them to take action. This set of projects around the Living Lab really highlighted the importance of students being let loose on data, on ideas around the city. The lessons here is that we should be addressing real world problems, public engagement is an important part of this, and we are no longer interdisiplinary, we are “post disciplinary” – as is much of the wider world of work and these skills will go with these students from the Living Lab for instance.

And so to Edinburgh Cityscope, a project with synergy across learning, research and engagement. Edinburgh Cityscope is NOT an app, it is an infrastructure. It is the stuff out of which other apps and projects will be built.

So, the first thing we had to do was made Cityscope futureproof. When we built iSpot the iPhone hadn’t been heard of, now maybe 40% of you here have one. And we’ve probably already had peak iPhone. We don’t know what will be used in 5 years time. But there are aspects they will always need… They will need Data. What kinds of data? For synergy and place we need maps. And maps can have layers – you can relate the nitrogen dioxide to traffic, you can compare the trees…. So Edinburgh Cityscope is mapable. And you need a way to bring these things together, you need a workbench. Right now that includes Jupyter, but we are not locked in, so we can change in future if we want to. And we have our data and our code open on Github. And then finally you need to have a presentation layer – a place to disseminate what we do to our students and colleagues, and what they have done.

So, in the last six months we’ve made progress in data – using Scottish Government open data portal we have Lung Cancer registrations that can be mapped and changes seen. We can compare and investigate and our students can do that. We have the SIMD (Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation) map… I won’t show you a comparison as it has hardly changed in decades – one area has been in poverty since around 1900. My colleague Leslia McAra is working in public engagement, with colleagues here, to engage in ways that make this better, that makes changes.

The workbench has been built. It isn’t pretty yet… You can press a button to create a Notebook. You can send your data to a phone app – pulling data from Cityscope and show it in an app. You can start a new tour blog – which anybody can do. And you create a survey for used for new information…

So let me introduce one of these apps. Curious Edinburgh is an app that allows you to learn about the history of science in Edinburgh, to explore the city. The genius idea – and I can say genius because I didn’t build it, Niki and the folks at EDINA did – is that you can create this tour from a blog. You fill in forms essentially. And there is an app which you can download for iOS, and a test version for Android – full one coming for the Edinburgh International Science Festival in April. Because this is an Edinburgh Cityscope project I’ve been able to use the same technology to create a tour of the botanical gardens for use in my teaching. We used to give out paper, now we have this app we can use in teaching, in teaching in new ways… And I think this will be very popular.

And the other app we have is Fieldtrip, a survey tool borrowed from EDINA’s FieldTrip Open. And that allows anyone to set up a data collection form – for research, for social data, for whatever. It is already open, but we are integrating this all into Edinburgh Cityscope.

So, this seems a good moment to talk about the funding for this work. We have had sizable funding from Information Services. The AHRC has funded some of the Curious Edinburgh work, and ESRC have funded work which a small part of which Edinburgh Cityscope will be using in building the community.

So, what next? We are piloting Cityscope with students – in the Festival of Creative Learning this week, in Informatics. And then we want to reach out to form a community of practice, including schools, community groups and citizens. And we want to connect with cultural institutions and industry – already working with the National Museum of Scotland. And we want to interface with the Internet of Things – anything with a chip in it really. You can interact with your heating systems from anywhere in the world – that’s the internet of things, things connected to the web. And I’m keen on creating an Internet of Living Things. The Atlas of Living Scotland displays all the biological data of Scotland on the map. But data gets out of date. It would be better to updated in real time. So my friend Kate Jones from UCL is working with Intel creating real time data from bats – allowing real time data to be captured through connected sensors. And also in that space Graham Stone (Edinburgh) is working on a project called Edinburgh Living Landscape which is about connecting up green spaces, improve biodiversity…

So, I think what we should be going for is for recognition of Edinburgh as the First UNESCO City of Learning. Edinburgh was the first UNESCO City of Literature and the people who did that are around, we can make our case for our status as City of Learning in much the same way.

So that’s pretty much the end. Nothing like this happens without lots and lots of help. So a big thanks here to Edinburgh Cityscope’s steering group and the many people in Information Services who have been actually building it.

And the final words are written for me: Four Quartets, T.S. Eliot:

“We shall not cease from exploration

And the end of all our exploring 

Will be to arrive where we started

And know the place for the first time”

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DATA-X Pioneering Research Data Exhibition & Symposium

DATA-X has been a University of Edinburgh IS Innovation Fund project, also supported by the Data Lab and ASCUS. The project provided a dynamic platform for University of Edinburgh student researchers across all schools to come together and develop collaborate installations that explore data re-use and interdisciplinary boundaries. Research data are often invisible and complex to comprehend by the public and academic peers, with evolving technology and researcher-driving environments, DATA-X facilitate student researchers with the opportunity to visualize and communicate their research in a user-friendly format to audiences from within and outside the university.

After a series of successful and engaging DATA-X workshops, aimed to inform, shape and create ‘installations’ linked to digital data, the multidisciplinary teams (including students from the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Edinburgh College of Art, Reid School of Music, the School of Engineering, The Centre for Synthetic and Systems Biology, the School of Chemistry, the Centre for Integrative Physiology and the Queen’s Medical Research Institute) continued to work on their installations throughout the summer in preparation for the DATA-X exhibition and Symposium.

DATA-X Exhibition: 

The DATA-X Exhibition ran from 26 November to 6 December 2016, in the Sculpture Court of the Edinburgh College of Art. A total of six physical installations were installed:

eTunes by Dr Siraj Sabihuddin

etunes1A collaborate project for novices to experience the process and creative input required in constructing a musical instrument from start to finish.

 

 

 

Feel the Heat by Nathalie Vladis and Julia Zaenker

feel-the-heatA data quilt, visualising world temperatures between 1961 to 1990. The installation included temperature data sets and interactive colouring maps for audience participation.

 

 

Inside the black box by Luis Fernando Montaño and Bohdan Mykhaylyk

black-boxAn installation simulating bacterial infections. The audience controls the bacterial infection by interactively administering treatment.

 

 

PUROS Sound Box by Dr. Sophia Banou, Dr. Christos Kakalis and Matt Giannotti

D:PDSound BoxSound Box 1_SB Model (1)An installation that ‘defines’ an ambient musical environment, that is conditioned by the movement of users on an interactive floor.

 

 

 

 

Sinterbot by Adela Rabell Montiell and Dr. Siraj Sabihuddin

sintering-process-300x179A hands on demonstration on the alternative use of an ordinary household microwave for sintering, in order to alter material by heat.

 

 

Surface of Significance by Lucas Godfrey and Matt Giannotti

SOS_PROMO1-300x240An audio-visual installation that reconceptualise geographic space. The installation explores the relationship between space, materiality and process.

 

 

 

The exhibition launch, on 26 November, also included three performance installations that serenaded the audience throughout the evening:

  • o ire by Prof. Nick Fells

A live audio performance during which the performance controller sculpt and shape sounds as the piece unfolds.

A composition based on wind data captured during Hurricane Matthew. Musicians captured the chaotic nature of the storm by moving around and inflecting sporadic sound intensity.

An excerpt of Oli Jan’s composition project ‘The Carnival of the Endangered Animals‘. The piece features sounds of endangered species on the IUCN Red List.

DATA-X Symposium

To accompany the exhibition, a DATA-X symposium was held on 1 December 2016 in the Main Lecture Theatre of the Edinburgh College of Art. PhD researchers presented their ‘installations’ and demonstrated the tools, processes and techniques behind the installation. This was an informal event and an open forum to facilitate discussion with an academic and non-academic audience. Guest speakers included Dr Jane Haley, Scientific Coordinator for Edinburgh Neuroscience and FUSION, and Dr James Howie, co-founder of ASCUS. Their talks entitled ‘FUSION –where art meets neuroscience’ and ‘ASCUS and the ASCUS Lab: catalysts for Artisience’, illustrated the efficacy of bridging the gap between the arts and sciences and how innovative, multidisciplinary projects can engage wider audiences and create novel public engagement initiatives.

The next and final phase of the project includes the creation of a DATA-X Exhibition Catalogue in which the students will publish their installations. Updates to follow soon.

Project Team

Data-X Project Manager: Stuart Macdonald (Associate Data Librarian at Edinburgh University Data Library)

Exhibition Coordinator: Dr. Rocio von Jungenfeld (Supported Research Data services at EDINA & Data Library)

Data-X PhD Interns:

Scully Beaver Lynch – PhD candidate in Architecture by Design, Edinburgh College of Art

Adela Rabell Montiel – PhD candidate in Cardiovascular Sciences, Edinburgh Medical School: Clinical Sciences

Cindy Nelson-Viljoen – PhD candidate in Archaeology, School of History, Classics and Archaeology

Dr. Siraj Sabihuddin – PhD in Electronic engineering, School of Engineering

Image credit: DATA-X blog. http://data-x.blogs.edina.ac.uk/

by Cindy Nelson-Viljoen
PhD Student Intern
EDINA and Data Library

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SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Bradford University (09 Feb 17)
  • Bristol University (02 Feb 17)
  • British Library (09 Feb 17)
  • British Museum (06 Feb 17)
  • CONSER (Not UK Holdings) (15 Feb 17)
  • Courtauld Institute of Art (07 Feb 17)
  • De Montfort University (20 Jan 17)
  • Exeter University (03 Feb 17)
  • King’s College London (01 Feb 17)
  • Kingston University (01 Feb 17)
  • National Library of Scotland (06 Feb 17)
  • Natural History Museum (01 Feb 17)
  • Oxford University (22 Jan 17)
  • Royal Society of Medicine (03 Feb 17)
  • Senate House Libraries, University of London (24 Jan 17)
  • Southampton University (11 Feb 17)
  • Sussex University (01 Feb 17)
  • Wellcome Library (30 Jan 17)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.

SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • Aberdeen University (05 Jan 17)
  • British Library (02 Feb 17)
  • CONSER (Not UK Holdings) (08 Feb 17)
  • London Metropolitan University (26 Jan 17)
  • National Archives (01 Feb 17)
  • St. Andrews University (16 Jan 17)
  • Southampton University (04 Feb 17)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.


Digimap for Schools and GCSE Geography

This week one of our users posted a tweet which gave a brief overview of the Edexcel Geography GCSE curriculum (Edexcel GCSE Geography Curriculum).  We immediately noted how valuable a resource Digimap for Schools could potentially be in this curriculum.  We noted that in particular, Component 2: “UK Geographical Issues” and Component 3: “People and the Environment Issues -Making Geographical Decisions” cited the use of OS maps at 1:25000 and 1:50000 numerous times.

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 12.35.59

We spent some time going through the full GCSE Edexcel Geography B specifications and noted the large number of topics and assessments where Digimap for Schools was applicable. Two areas in particular: Topic 4: “The UK’s evolving physical landscape” and Topic 6: “Geographical investigation” cited the use of Ordnance Survey maps several times in the ‘Integrated Skills” sections.    See below:

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 12.49.05

We also noted that this GCSE also required 2 fieldwork investigations, one for physical geography (coasts or rivers) and one for human geography (dynamic urban areas or changing rural areas).  We already provide some guidance on how Digimap for Schools can be used directly for fieldwork in two videos on our youtube channel: Fieldwork Webinar and Using FieldTrip GB with Digimap for Schools

We believe that Digimap for Schools is the perfect tool for providing this OS mapping, but also has the added functionality of providing GIS elements such as the ability to add point files which would cover some of the assessment criteria within this particular exam specification.

We believe Digimap for Schools is the perfect resource allowing pupils to access all the relevant OS maps required within the GCSE curriculum (we think it’s also the GB mapping used within the most exam papers), it also provides the tools to undertake all the assessment objectives in a simple, no fuss way.  We also believe it facilitates the GIS components of the curriculum (please someone tell us if it doesn’t, but we genuinely believe it does :-) ).

I did a quick look through some of the other examination boards and can report that it’s a similar story with the OS 1:25000 and 1:50000 maps being persistently cited for usage, so Digimap for Schools is applicable for these examination boards also.

Anyhow, I did a quick video which identifies the areas of the Edexcel specifications and some of the AQA specifications where I think we Digimap for Schools can help.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Aerial Digimap data: The mapping service where it’s always sunny

The latest Digimap addition is aerial photo images, covering the whole of Great Britain to 25cm precision. The University of Edinburgh has just subscribed to Aerial Digimap, so the great news is that staff and students can now access these wonderful images, overlay them onto other map layers, and combine them with building height and topology data to make amazing and beautiful three-dimensional maps of the whole of Britain.

Map created using Aerial Digimap

I’ve used Aerial Digimap to label the entrance to Argyle House, home of EDINA. © GetMapping and University of Edinburgh. This map contains OS data.

Digimap is a visual interface that allows users to explore, annotate and download mapping data covering the whole of Great Britain.* Digimap’s historical map data go back as far as the 1840s, while geological, marine and environmental data have been available for some time.

It’s strikingly sunny in the images of Edinburgh. The Digimap team confirmed this is a UK-wide phenomenon: “Aerial Photography can only be captured on clear days, so it’s always sunny in Aerial Roam!”

You can watch a guided tour of Aerial Digimap’s features and a demonstration of how to make the most of them by EDINA’s Ian Holmes in this recently recorded webinar:Â

Click here to view the embedded video.

.

To get started with Aerial Digimap, login with your EASE account at: http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/aerial

* For mapping data covering Northern Ireland, please see Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland.

 

Pauline Ward is a Research Data Service Assistant based at EDINA, supporting staff and students at the University of Edinburgh

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Highlights from the RDM Programme Progress Report: May to July 2016

The following key results were highlighted in the RDM Programme Progress Report:

  • There were 42 new users and 69 data management plans created with DMPOnline.
  • An additional 1.5PB has been procured for DataStore’s general capacity expansions.
  • The Roslin Institute has deposited 16 datasets into Data Vault.
  • DataShare upload release (2.1) went live on 23 May 2016.
  • There are now 334 dataset records in PURE, an increase of 124 records from the last reporting period (February to April 2016).
  • 54 datasets have been deposited into DataShare.
  • The University of Edinburgh was recommended as a preferred supplier on the Framework for the Research Data Management Shared Services for Jisc Services Ltd (JSL) for the following Lots:
  • Lot 2: Repository Interfaces
  • Lot 3: Data Exchange Interface
  • Lot 6: Research Data Preservation Tools Development
  • Lot 8: User Experience Enhancements
  • A total of 390 staff and postgraduates attended RDM courses and workshops during this quarter.
  • A total of 3,649 learners enrolled for the 5-week RDMS MOOC rolling course from March through July, 2016 and a total of 461 people completed the course in the same time frame.
  • There were 5,198 MANTRA sessions recorded from May to July with 58 to 60 percent identified as new users.
  • Set up an RDM Forum in collaboration with College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS) Research Officer and Research Outputs Co-ordinator. The first RDM forum is scheduled for Wednesday, 7 September 2016.

Data Management Planning highlights

We currently hold sample data management plans for grant applications submitted to the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Medical Research Council (MRC).

 Active Data Infrastructure highlights

DataStore

An additional 1.5PB has been procured for general capacity expansions. This capacity will primarily be deployed to the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine (CMVM) and the College of Science & Engineering (CSE).

MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine (IGMM) has purchased an additional 1.2PB of capacity, and this is now deployed in their dedicated file system.

Data Stewardship highlights

DataShare

The large data sharing investigation was completed for DataShare and reported previously. Upload release (2.1) went live on 23 May 2016. Download release planned following ‘embargo release’ and ShareGeo spatial data migration.

Data Vault

There was a soft release of Data Vault in February 2016, with the Roslin Institute depositing 16 datasets during this quarter.

PURE

There are now 334 dataset records in PURE, an increase of 124 records from the last reporting period (February to April 2016).

Research Data Discovery Service (RDDS)

Two PhD interns are working on School engagement activities (dataset records into PURE / datasets into DataShare) for Divinity & Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine; contracts end 16 September 2016. One PhD intern retrospectively added DataShare metadata to PURE for data deposits prior to PURE Data Catalogue functionality; contract to end 16 September 2016. A fourth PhD intern (to work with School of Informatics) is awaiting for approval.

Data Management Support highlights

A total of 390 staff and postgraduates attended RDM courses and workshops during this quarter.

Other related research data management support activities to highlight

  • A talk was given ‘Understanding and overcoming challenges to sharing personal and sensitive data’ at the ReCon (Research Communication and Data Visualisation) Conference, 24th June 2016, The Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation (ECCI).
  • ‘Working with sensitive data in research’ guide was written for research staff and students in social sciences.
  • Another guide is being written on ‘Sharing and retaining data’ for research staff and students in social sciences.
  • Set up an RDM Forum in collaboration with College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS) Research Officer and Research Outputs Co-ordinator. The first RDM forum is scheduled for Wednesday, 7 September 2016.

Other activities to highlight

The outcome of Jisc RDM Shared Services bid that was submitted in March 2016

The Procurement Panel has recommended University of Edinburgh as a preferred supplier on the Framework for the Research Data Management Shared Services for Jisc Services Ltd (JSL) for the following Lots:

  • Lot 2: Repository Interfaces
  • Lot 3: Data Exchange Interface
  • Lot 6: Research Data Preservation Tools Development
  • Lot 8: User Experience Enhancements

Unfortunately, the Procurement Panel has decided not to recommend University of Edinburgh for the following Lots:

  • Lot 1: Research Data Repository
  • Lot 4: Research Information and Administration Systems Integrations

National and International Engagement Activities

From May to June

Stuart Macdonald and Rocio von Jungenfeld ran three workshops for the IS Innovation Fund project, Data-X: Pioneering Research Data Exhibition, with PhD students from across the University. Introduction to Data-X: Pioneering Research Data Exhibition

In June

Stuart Macdonald presented peer-reviewed presentation to IASSIST conference, Bergen: Supporting the development of a national Research Data Discovery Service – a Pilot Project

Robin Rice presented a poster at Open Repositories 2016, Dublin: Data Curation Lifecycle Management at the University of Edinburgh

Pauline Ward presented a lightning talk at Open Repositories 2016, Dublin:  Growing Open Data: Making the sharing of XXL-sized research data files online a reality, using Edinburgh DataShare

Stuart Macdonald was an invited speaker at NFAIS (National Federation of Abstracting and Information Services) Fostering Open Science Virtual Seminar: NFAIS Fostering Open Science Virtual Seminar

In July

Robin Rice gave two presentations (invited and peer-reviewed) at LIBER 2016, Helsinki: University of Edinburgh RDM Training: MANTRA & beyond; Designing and delivering an international MOOC on Research Data Management and Sharing

Robin Rice filled in for Stuart Lewis as invited speaker for JISC-CNI 2016, London: Managing active research in the University of Edinburgh

This is the last quarterly report as the Research Data Management (RDM) Roadmap Project (August 2012 to July 2016) came to a close on 31 July 2016.

There will be discussions with the RDM Steering Group to decide how future reporting will be conducted. These reports will be released on the Research Data Blog as well.

Tony Mathys
Research Data Management Service Co-ordinator

 

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SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • British Library (19 Jan 17)
  • Cambridge University (06 Jan 17)
  • CONSER (Not UK Holdings) (18 Jan 17)
  • Cranfield University (20 Jan 17)
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (20 Jan 17)
  • Dundee University (01 Jan 17)
  • Glasgow University (06 Jan 17)
  • Nottingham University (19 Jan 17)
  • Royal Society of Medicine (06 Jan 17)
  • Southampton University (21 Jan 17)
  • University of the West of England (23 Jan 17)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.


SUNCAT updated

SUNCAT has been updated. Updates from the following libraries were loaded into the service over the past week. The dates displayed indicate when files were received by SUNCAT.

  • British Library (12 Jan 17)
  • Exeter University (06 Jan 17)
  • Institution of Civil Engineers (04 Jan 17)
  • King’s College London (01 Jan 17)
  • London Library (13 Jan 17)
  • London School of Economics and Political Science (01 Jan 17)
  • Manchester University (01 Jan 17)
  • Open University (01 Jan 17)
  • Queen’s University, Belfast (03 Jan 17)
  • Royal College of Music (16 Jan 17)
  • Southampton University (14 Jan 17)
  • Strathclyde University (01 Jan 17)
  • Sussex University (01 Jan 17)
  • Swansea University (01 Jan 17)
  • York University (01 Jan 17)

To check on the currency of other libraries on SUNCAT please check the updates page for further details.